Updating the Global Pound Conference: A Survey on Mediation in Cross-Border Disputes

By Angela Cipolla

The recent Report on International Mediation and Enforcement Mechanisms found that, while mediation survey respondents believe in the necessity of using the process for cross-border disputes, a lack of education about how mediation works is a problem.

The report’s results also strongly boost calls for an international mediation enforcement mechanism.

The recent report was issued by the Institute for Dispute Resolution, at New Jersey City University’s School of Business in Jersey City, N.J., to the International Mediation Institute for the benefit of delegates attending the UNCITRAL Working Group II (Dispute Settlement) 67th Session, on dispute settlement, which was held last month in Vienna. For more information, see www.imimediation.org.

The report follows and incorporates results of surveying done at the Global Pound Conference, which concluded a year of face-to-face meetings with practitioners worldwide in July. See http://globalpound.org; for a wrap-up of the GPC series, see CPR Speaks blog post at http://bit.ly/2vxV2P1.  The IMI and NJCU IDR surveys received responses from users in various fields and professions that represented, according to respondents who identified their locations, 24 countries.

The information was collected in the 28 GPC events held in 22 countries, as well as through online voting. Votes were categorized by stakeholders.

The report, written by David S. Weiss, director of the Institute for Dispute Resolution and a visiting scholar at the New Jersey City University’s business school, and New Jersey attorney Michael R. Griffith, analyzed views on establishing an international treaty for the enforcement of mediated settlements collected online from June 2016 to March 2017; it also analyzed responses from the Global Pound Conference Survey, which was available at IMI Global Pound Conference gatherings and online from March 2016 to September.

The report also expands upon how the international legal and business communities use mediation.  See S.I. Strong, “Use and Perception of International Commercial Mediation and Conciliation: A Preliminary Report on Issues Relating to the Proposed UNCITRAL Convention on International Commercial Mediation and Conciliation,” U. of Missouri School of Law Legal Studies Research Paper (Nov. 17, 2014)(available at http://bit.ly/2yAzUhp).

Overview

Weiss and Griffith gathered the opinions of “those who are most likely affected by the adoption of any prospective drafts or proposals by Working Group II (Dispute Settlement) with emphasis on the users.” The views, reflecting 103 survey responses, reflect the “wider business community, their advisors, providers, and those that may influence the mediation space,” they write. The GPC conference and online surveying produced responses from about 2,500 stakeholders.

The report follows the same pedagogical and methodological process as Strong’s article, presenting research “gathered by an international quantitative-qualitative study of users’ assessments of the enforcement of international commercial settlement agreements resulting from conciliation.”

The Report’s Findings

With regard to the report’s own survey questions, the study brought to light a lack of education regarding the benefits and uses of mediation in cross-border disputes. It found that 40% of the respondents said they use or have been advised to use mediation in a cross-border dispute as a best practice in business “infrequently,” and 24% answered “not at all.”

When users were asked why they thought parties do not resolve their commercial cross-border disputes through mediation, the most frequent answer at 57% of the responses was that “they are unfamiliar with mediation.”

The study called the result “a surprisingly [sic] lack of knowledge about mediation among users.”

These results demonstrate a need for more education about mediation. Interestingly, the second highest-ranked reason in response to the question was that no universal mechanism to enforce a mediated settlement exists.

While the IMI and NJCU survey also showed “a general positive direction of users to incorporate mediation clauses into cross-border contracts,” 80% of users were even more apt to participate in mediation if there was a uniform global mechanism to enforce mediation settlements in place.

This demonstrates the incentive that such a mechanism would provide and the possible positive effects it would have on mediation use in cross-border disputes.

Accordingly, the report found that the majority of users and stakeholders in both the study conducted for the report and the GPC surveying “believe that a uniform global mechanism to enforce mediation settlements would improve commercial dispute resolution.”

Some concerns regarding faith and trust in the mediation process were raised in the IMI and NJCU study’s comments, suggesting that more confidence in the process needs to be built as the use of mediation becomes more prevalent.

The report also looked to whether a treaty should include provisions similar to the longstanding Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards, better known as the New York Convention.

This idea was well received. An overwhelming 84% of users stated that they would be “more likely” to use or increase their use of mediation in a cross-border dispute if there were a uniform global mechanism in place, similar to the New York Convention, which would ensure enforcements of settlement agreements.

The report speculates that a majority of users would like to use the uniform mechanism as a “bargaining chip;” 60% of users stated that they would prefer an “opt-in” system.

Additionally, the report examined the challenges users faced in mediation. When asked whether users faced any post-mediation challenges to settlement agreements in cross-border disputes on the grounds of capacity, duress, or fraud, the two largest recorded answers were 47%, responding “never,” and 36% responding, “sometimes.”

The report also asked users whether they would be less likely to use mediation if a uniform global mechanism of enforcement included any defenses.  The question didn’t show that defenses would have a significant impact on a user’s willingness. Forty-four percent of the users responded “no,” while 27% responded “yes.”

When asked if the users would prefer a uniform global mechanism that limited defenses, similar to the New York Convention’s Article V, 54% of users responded “yes,” while 22% responded “no.”

The report also revealed that though re-litigating settlements doesn’t occur often, the rate was high.  The study found that 35% of users answered “infrequently” when asked if they have ever were required to re-litigate on general contract defense a mediation settlement agreement that was not honored. “If this was not a problem,” the authors wrote, “we would expect to see user’s answering ‘infrequently’ at a much lower percentage.”

This indicates a problem that a global enforcement mechanism might help alleviate. Additionally, regarding the availability of mediators, the report showed that “[w]hile it is generally positive that 61% of users are generally able to find qualified mediators, there [is] a vast amount of room for improvement.”

In addition to its own questions, the report also analyzed the GPC Series Questions. The report found that just like the users in its study, a majority of GPC stakeholders “believe that a uniform global mechanism to enforce mediation settlements would improve commercial dispute resolution, with 51% [of users concurring.]”

Overall, the GPC Series Questions had a positive view of taking action on mediation settlement enforcement.  Those conference and web survey questions found 51% of users “clearly supporting a uniform global mechanism to enforce mediation settlements as their first preference.”

* * *

The report concludes that global enforcement of mediation settlement agreements is a “necessary tool for encouraging mediation,” and that such an enforcement mechanism should be “congruent with the methodological approach that was adopted by the arbitration community through the New York Convention.”

The report further emphasizes that “practical certainty” in mediated settlement agreements will (1) improve access to justice and (2) “increase efficiency for the wider business community,” and that both of these benefits are crucial to advance trading systems and aide businesses.

UNCITRAL’s Working Group II’s 68th session, expected to consider a mediation enforcement convention further, is scheduled to be held in New York, from Feb. 5 – 9.

* * *

The author is a Fall 2017 CPR Institute Intern.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s