CEDR’s Eileen Carroll: Her Mediation Story

By Antranik Chekemian

F. Peter Phillips, director of New York Law School’s Alternative Dispute Resolution Skills Program, welcomed an online audience earlier this month as part of the program’s long-running lunchtime speaker series for a session with veteran U.K. mediator Eileen Carroll.

Carroll is founder of London-based Centre for Effective Dispute Resolution, better known as CEDR, “by far the most influential and prescient dispute resolution organization not only in the U.K., but really . . .  in Europe,” said Phillips in the introduction to the Feb. 10 session, which had about 40 attendees.

Phillips invited Carroll to share her professional background and how her journey into the ADR world started.  Carroll opened describing, among other things, a long history with the publisher of this CPR Speaks blog, the International Institute for Conflict Prevention and Resolution, and recounted some of those interactions over these years.  [Phillips is a former CPR senior vice president.]

She said she was a senior litigation partner at a London law firm in the 1980s, with “good contacts” in the U.S., and she took a six-month secondment to San Francisco.  “I was one of the senior litigation partners and they asked me whether I would go and work with a firm on the west coast,” she said, “and I took myself off to San Francisco.”

She said that she decided her focus would be alternative dispute resolution. “I learned a bit about mediation from some of the research I had done, and I thought that would be my project,” she said. She noted that she was impressed by how the mediation process “extracted people from the drama of litigation.” Carroll explained:

I then was given a book called The Manager’s Guide to Resolving Legal Disputes by Henry and Lieberman.  . . . Jim Henry, based in New York, who had started . . .  CPR. He became a very dear friend, and I was going to write a book, but someone gave me his book . . . and I decided when I read that I was really fired up to do something.

James F. Henry is founder of CPR, and Jethro Lieberman is a former CPR vice president and a retired New York Law School professor.

Carroll showed the audience an article she wrote stemming from her U.S. work, “Are We Ready for ADR in Europe?” International Financial Law Review 8 Part 12, 11 (1989).

The article’s title, she said, “was a question no one had asked, and I was determined that we were going to be ready for ADR in Europe. But I knew […] that I needed to do something to get a support behind me, so I set about founding a nonprofit organization.” She added, “I did get inspiration from Jim [Henry].”

She added, “By the time we launched CEDR, I had managed to get with the help of others–80 big companies to support the idea–[and] the major law firms in London didn’t want to be left out, so they thought they better support the idea.”

Philips jumped in and mentioned that CEDR’s story was similar to the CPR Institute’s origin in the U.S. “It wasn’t as if the idea was ‘Let’s take mediation and convince people of it’ so much as it was ‘Let’s take a core of leading owners of disputes–leading corporations, people who spend a lot of money litigating–and convene them so that they become the torchbearers,” said Phillips, adding, “They became the people who are convincing their peers.”

Carroll said that the ties to North America in her work continues, citing current work with the International Academy of Mediators. [CPR and CEDR continue to collaborate on seminars and trainings. Information on the next scheduled joint training–a four-day advanced mediation skills training seminar that begins April 19, in which the organizations will be joined by the Silicon Valley Arbitration & Mediation Center, is available on CPR’s website here.]

Philips asked Carroll about the role of emotion in commercial mediation, noting “the challenge to determine the extent to which . . . the expression of emotion in a commercial context is helpful.”

Carroll said, “In every conflict, there is emotion–people are upset in some way or other. Whether it’s because they have been avoiding it, whether it’s anger, whether it’s anxiety, all of those emotions I find present, and they display themselves in different ways, because we all have different kinds of personalities.”

She stressed the importance of “creating an environment where people can tell whatever their story is.” She stated that a mediator’s job is not to patronize but to notice the parties’ emotions and feelings, and explore them at the right moment with the right questions.

Carroll further emphasized that there is not a uniform approach in mediation. “There may be several working sessions with different people,” she said, “so to deal with these emotions, you have to go at it carefully without too many assumptions and create the space to get to know the people that you’re going to work with.”

Phillips then asked Carroll about the challenges women encounter in ADR. “When you were a practicing lawyer, you were very frequently the only woman in the room,” he said, “In the early days of ADR, you were very frequently one of the very few women who was making a go of it,” he said.

She emphasized that because law firms usually advise their clients during the mediator selection process, “they often follow the same kind of pattern of three names.” She expanded:

When l look back to the beginning of the field when we first started, . . . there was just a sense that we need people with status, people with experience, so at that point people were kind of looking to, ‘Who were those senior people?’ And the legal profession, even in the early 90s, a lot of those people were men. It is changing. But . . . those who were early entrants to the field obviously got . . . a reputation. [If they] were good mediators and good arbitrators who were around in the mid-90s, some of those people still have incredibly effective practices today.

Phillips then asked Carroll about a recent CEDR report that discussed “how female mediators view their strengths as opposed to how male mediators view their strengths.” [CEDR’s current research can be found here.]

“[W]omen recognized that they were good at relationships and empathy,” said Carroll, recalling the research, “and a lot of guys obviously have that experience, but . . . a lot of the men saw themselves as more as getting the deal done, much more transactional.”

Carroll then referred attendees to a Simon Baron-Cohen’s 2012 book, “The Essential Difference: Men, Women and the Extreme Male Brain, which discusses these issues.

“Women do have some very natural abilities in relation to communication skills and they have done work with babies, boys, and girls . . . and the way they react.  . . . So, women have a lot of natural skill in the area of mediation which I think sometimes they underplay because if you look at in life, women often have the role of having to make . . . all the relationships work within a family, sometimes in an office,” said Carroll.

Emphasizing the need for diversity, she concluded, “Women absolutely have the capability to do any tough mediation, because they have got the intellectual skill, they understand the background of the problem. There is no reason why there could not be as many successful commercial women mediators as men. I think it’s something about the filter of the selection process, which I think is changing.”

“All the business people I have worked with through the years in mediation, I have never had a problem,” said Carroll.  “Over time,” she continued, “I have never . . . felt any concern in dealing with business people about the role of the woman mediator. Never. I would not say that was always the case in relation to certain members of the bar.  . . . I have always managed to walk around it. It hasn’t been a problem.”

She concluded her presentation discussing instilling “patience and persistence” into mediation to make it successful.

* * *

Eileen Carroll’s presentation is archived at the NYLS ADR Program link above and directly on YouTube here.

* * *

The author, a second-year student at New York’s Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, is a CPR 2021 intern.

[END]

#CPRAM21: Managing Workplace Conflicts, On-site and Remote

If you missed the 2021 CPR Annual Meeting in January—the first free public meeting held online in the organization’s 40-year history—the videos are being posted on CPR’s YouTube Channel. While additional videos will be posted for CPR members only, the first, linked here on CPR Speaks, is open access and features the keynoters, CNN Anchor and Chief Political Correspondent Dana Bash and General James Mattis, who is former U.S. Defense Secretary. Click the Subscribe button at YouTube for alerts and for more CPR content. For information on full access and joining CPR, please visit CPR’s Membership webpage here.

By Antranik Chekemian

Kimberley Lunetta, who represents management in employment matters as of counsel at Morgan Lewis & Bockius, moderated a third-day CPR Annual Meeting panel on state-of-the-art best practices for addressing and resolving workplace disputes. The panel mainly concentrated on managing employees and disputes in the current remote environment, and how to set up an ADR program in order to prevent and resolve conflicts.

The Jan. 29 session included four panelists:

  • Alfred G. Feliu, who heads his own New York firm, is a longtime panelist for CPR Dispute Resolution and the American Arbitration Association’s commercial and employment arbitration and mediation panels. He is past chair of the New York State Bar Association’s Labor and Employment Law Section and a fellow of the College of Commercial Arbitrators and the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers.
  • Wayne Outten is chair and founder of New York’s Outten & Golden LLP, which focuses on representing employees. He has represented employees for more than 40 years as a litigator. He has long advocated for using mediation in employment disputes. His practice focuses on problem solving, negotiating, and counseling on behalf of employees.
  • Cheryl M. Manley is a veteran labor employment attorney with more than 25 years of  experience, and since 2005 has been at Charter Communications, where she is senior vice president and associate general counsel of employment law, leading the broadband/cable operator’s Employment Law Group.
  • Andrew J. Weissler is a partner in the labor and employment group of Husch Blackwell. He is a member of the firm’s virtual office, the Link, based in Bloomington, Ill. Weissler advises and represents public and private clients on workplace issues involving difficult personnel decisions.

Feliu and Outten are on a subcommittee of CPR’s Employment Disputes Committee that is working on a model workplace disputes program, along with a new version of CPR’s Employment Dispute Arbitration Procedure to be issued soon.

A poll conducted at the beginning of the panel showed that remote working was new for most of the participants.

Lunetta launched the discussion by asking Feliu about the threshold questions employers should ask themselves when considering an ADR program.

If the principal goal is avoiding litigation, responded Feliu, then employers “are really focusing on processing existing or incipient claims.” As a result, he said, employers “are going to focus more on arbitration–on ending up with a process that brings an ultimate result.”

But if the employer’s goal is more on problem solving and identifying tensions before they become disputes and the employer views conflict resolution as a strategic imperative, then the alternative approach of problem-solving should be embraced, he said. Here, the focus is different than pure litigation avoidance. Said Feliu, “Litigation avoidance or reduction of legal costs will be part–will be an effect, hopefully–of the problem-solving process but wouldn’t necessarily be the goal.”

This approach would also help the organization become more competitive, he said–to work more constructively and efficiently while, as an after-effect, avoiding litigation.

Feliu explained, “How do you do this? You do this is by opening up lines of communication, by necessarily undercutting to a certain extent the chain of command. You’re empowering employees to come forward with their disputes at whatever level and whatever the nature. And by doing that, you are creating a different kind of an organization that is less hierarchical, less structured, and more fluid.”

Wayne Outten added that ADR is ideal for workplace disputes. Because there already is an important relationship between both sides and the relationship is typically continuing, said Outten, it “is a perfect place for identifying problems and solving them early on.” He then presented two approaches that companies can embrace for dispute resolution procedures, the legal mentality and the human resources mentality.

The legal mentality, said Outten, is, “Let’s find a way to avoid lawsuits and to maximize the chances that we will win them with the least possible costs.” He said the HR approach is better, with goals of making employees happy and providing an environment where workers can be productive and focus on their jobs in an effective and efficient manner.

With the HR approach, Outten said, a program should start identifying problems at the earliest possible stage. “If a problem ripens into a dispute,” he said, the goal is “resolving the dispute in the simplest, quickest way possible and escalating only as and when you need to.” The HR approach also serves the lawyers’ perspective as it “tends to avoid disputes ripening into the possibility of litigation.”

Lunetta then asked the panelists whether having employees working from home in a number of states, possibly new states to the company, would affect the design of an ADR program.

Al Feliu responded that working from home would not alter or change the program itself, but it increases and amplifies “the need for it to be enforceable across 50 states and 50 jurisdictions.”

Wayne Outten discussed some of the positive and negative changes regarding the nature of workplace disputes that come with remote working. On one hand, the kind of disputes that arise from being in the same place, and having interpersonal reactions, presumably will be reduced with the increase in virtual offices, such as sexual harassment claims and bullying.

“On the other hand,” he said, “the opportunities for disputes are exacerbated because you don’t have as much free-flowing communication, and the ability to address things face to face.” Outten added, “Disputes may fester.”

From the management-side perspective, Husch Blackwell’s A.J. Weissler noted that the HR model Outten mentioned “has changed quite a bit in this remote work environment.” If the employees are typically working remotely, then having difficult conversations over the Internet should be acceptable, he said.  

But if a human resources or corporate employee is working from home while the business has essential workers who have been going to the employer’s worksite, then, says Weissler, “there’s a real disconnect there” that can make the on-site workers feel and sense that the employer is not in touch with the employee.

Moderator Kimberley Lunetta then asked panelists whether CPR has resources that can help employers think through these issues if they are considering any of the dispute resolution options that were discussed.

Outten said that this was the reason for CPR to be founded decades ago, with the goal of helping companies figure out how to avoid and resolve disputes.

Outten announced that CPR and its Employment Disputes Committee will be publishing a new set of rules for administered employment dispute resolution.  Accompanying the rules will include “draft programs that companies can adopt and adapt for their own use, which have within them the various different stages that employers can consider […] including things . . . [like] informal dispute resolution and problem solving, . . . open-door policies that invite people to take their problems up the chain of command,” ombudspersons, peer review processes and “all the way up to mediation which . . . is perfectly suited for employment disputes of all kinds.”

The conversation then revolved around the pluses and minuses for an employer of establishing a mandatory arbitration program.

“In reaching the decision that our arbitration program was going to be mandatory,” responded Charter Communications’ Cheryl Manley, “one of the factors that went into play was either reducing the litigation costs, or perhaps not having to deal with court litigation.” She mentioned that her company’s program was built to resolve issues in a timely manner and on an individualized basis.

She further added that her organization has many steps before getting to the arbitration phase to resolve the employment issue. And “when it finally does get to arbitration, we believe that there’s some certainty,” said Manley, “We believe that both parties have some skin in the game, in terms of selecting the arbitrator and primarily, it’s cost effective and efficient.”

Outten then answered a question about CPR’s employment ADR program and how it can help employers not only set up, but also ensure long-term success.

Outten reiterated the program’s strength in early-stage problem solving and early dispute resolution, and added that the program offers room for flexibility and adaptability in different workplaces.

Mediation with a third-party facilitator, he said, “can be extremely valuable and beneficial. It gives the parties an opportunity to air their grievances.” When it comes to arbitration, he said, every successful workplace ADR program really needs to comply “at a minimum,” with due process protocols.”

He then presented several key features of the due process protections (which CPR has adopted here), which include:

  • “The employee isn’t required to pay more than they would pay if they were going to file in court.”
  • “The arbitrator has the authority and power to provide any remedy that a court can provide so that there’s no takeaway of remedies for the affected employee.”
  • “The employee has a fair opportunity to pick the decision maker–the arbitrator–especially given the binding power of the decision of this person to resolve the dispute.”
  • “The employee has to have a full and fair opportunity to gather information in order to present the case and . . . [any] defenses.”
  • “The employee needs to have an opportunity to have counsel of his or her choosing.”
  • “The hearing itself should be reasonably convenient . . .  so the employee doesn’t have to go a long distance to have his or her day in court.”
  • Finally, “the arbitration should end with a reasoned decision, so the parties know what the arbitrator took into account, what the findings were on the evidence, and what the legal conclusions were in determining” the decision.

A.J. Weissler added that “there are great legal reasons” not to “cram down” arbitration in a workplace disputes program, citing fairness. He said that arbitrator selection is an important factor in presenting a fair process, with a say for the employees.

Al Feliu noted that there is a dearth of diverse panelists, but major providers have made strides and continue to work on the problem to enhance and ensure fairness.

Cheryl Manley agreed with the comments, and emphasized that panelists need to reflect the workplace population.

Manley discussed Charter Communication’s Solution Channel, which she described as a 2017 program to compel arbitration use—a mandatory program for newly signed-on employees, with about 10% of the company’s 90,000 employees opting out when it was launched.  She reported that the complaints are restricted to legal claims—non-legal disputes are addressed in other ways–that are submitted through a third-party vendor which create a record over the claim. She said the American Arbitration Association is the provider.  The company absorbs the AAA filing fees and the arbitrator costs. If either side is unsatisfied with the panel, they return to the AAA for more choices.

Weissler says arbitration should be part of any dispute resolution system but if it’s made mandatory and employees are forced to use it, he said, it is counterproductive and it creates problems going forward due to the “asymmetrical” views.

Weissler said he encourages mediation as a best option. He said he is skeptical of programs that outline steps that do not allow a course of mediation to be developed.

Feliu says he has been mediating for 30 years and familiarity has grown during his period of practice after skepticism.  He agreed with Weissler’s points, but noted that mandatory mediation in New York federal court, where he said he would have expected resistance—mandatory is counterintuitive, said Feliu—it has been just as successful as voluntary mediation over about the past 10 years.

Feliu said sometimes there is grumbling but mostly, when parties get to the bargaining table, they try to settle. And he said that while joint sessions are fading, flexibility is needed.  “Every mediation is different,” he said.

Wayne Outten said that he shared Al Feliu’s experience.  In the mid-1980s, he said, the plaintiffs’ bar “viewed this newfangled process as a conspiracy to take away their rights, and I soon discovered that was not necessarily the case and became a big advocate.”

Over the past 35 years, said Outten, mediation “has become quite normal.” He echoed Feliu again,  noting that when parties attempt mediation in good faith, it is successful.

Even in situations with a lot of open issues, he said, mediation “has a very high success rate, . . .  and is always worth trying.”

Cheryl Manley said that pre-pandemic, her company didn’t want anything done virtually or remotely—all depositions, mediations and arbitration hearings were done in person, exclusively.  The change was swift, she said. “Fast forward seven, eight, nine months, . . . when we finally emerge from this pandemic, we aren’t going to go back to all depositions in person, all mediations in person or hearings,” said Manley, adding, “In fact, I think that there is no reason . . . to start putting people back on planes traveling all over the country.  It is expensive. It’s time consuming.  And it is not efficient. “ She said that the “only issues” are “the occasional technological” problems.

A.J. Weissler said he has participated in virtual matters frequently during the pandemic, and found “an incredible benefit.” Having the people resources ready on video, whether from home or for those back in their offices, has “been an incredible thing,” he said, adding that he strongly supports virtual mediations.

Wayne Outten said he always has had a concern whether real decision makers would be in the mediation room.  “Now with virtual mediations,” he said, “that problem can be more readily addressed.”

Al Feliu said he has only done virtual mediations since his first in March.  “All of the impediments, and all of the arguments against them, have been rebuffed, “ he said. For example, he explained, he can evaluate credibility better on close-up video than across a bargaining table.

Feliu conceded that there is a different feel in an in-person gathering where people have committed to the process.  That intensity, he said, isn’t present where people are sitting on their couches, are more relaxed, with their dogs nearby.  “It’s just a different process,” he said.  “I don’t have the shrieking episodes. I don’t have a lot of emotions.  Is it good or bad? It’s just different.”

The result, he said, has been that he isn’t settling cases on the first day as much as he did at in-person mediations.

Addressing audience questions, Al Feliu said he discusses confidentiality with the parties with heightened concerns, noting that a potentially serious issue could be where extra people are present, and not visible on screen, as well as individuals texting on the side. “These are all serious concerns we need to get equilibrium on” going into the mediation, he said.

* * *

The author, a second-year student at New York’s Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, is a CPR 2021 intern. Alternatives editor Russ Bleemer contributed writing and research to this report.

[END]

The Zoom in Arbitration: #CPRAM21 Practitioners Focus on Virtual ADR

By Claudia Diaz

Below are notes from the 2021 CPR Annual Meeting third-day panel, “Hot Topics In ADR And Year-End Wrap Up,” an hour-long Jan. 29 afternoon event.

  • Moderator Ana Reyes, a partner in Washington, D.C.’s Williams & Connolly, provided questions to three panels members, opening by noting that the effect of the pandemic on litigation and dispute resolution–including the adjustments the legal profession has taken, and which practices will be continuing–was the key hot topic that came up for the panel in preparing for the CPR Annual Meeting session.
  • Reyes’ first question for the panel was to comment on trends.  She said, “I have read that in this world of COVID that there are two recent trends in dispute resolution: more not less dispute resolution, and sooner not later.”  
  • Panelist Thomas J. Roberts, Chief Counsel, Litigation, Boeing Defense, Space & Security, in Arlington, Va., noted that he has seen a marginal increase toward more alternative dispute resolution. Initially there was hesitation to do mediation in a virtual setting, but he reported that his department has learned that virtual mediation works well. An in-house counsel, he said, should always think about resolution through mediation whenever a dispute arises. It is the best way to have a settlement conversation, he said, and the dispute will benefit from the guidance of a third-party neutral.
    • There are right and wrong reasons to mediate. Covid-19 has delayed dispute resolution, more so for courts than for arbitration. And he said you don’t want to mediate for the wrong reasons, focusing on entering and using the process solely because of the delays.
    • Still, with the delays, the windows for engaging in mediation are a little bit wider, which is lessening the hesitancy to mediate, giving people more time to consider it.
  • Question for Panelist Yvette Ostolaza, a Sidley Austin partner in the Dallas and Houston offices: Has the pandemic changed your clients’ desire to avoid a virtual hearing that they might not be able to delay? Are they trying to mediate where they would not before?
    • Ostolaza:
      • Virtual hearings are effective. Some clients said to wait, but the parties tried it “because there were bankruptcy issues.” After a securities class-action case mediation with 10 people, she said, “I found it way more effective to be by virtual and by a video than if I had been at an office.” So, efficiency was much better virtually than in person.
      • In virtual arbitration, there were differences in terms of the strengths of the party presentations, and more training is encouraged for participants.
      • There is something about video that makes it so obvious about who is not engaged. Participants need to behave as if they were in the courtroom. “We had one arbitrator that was clearly not paying attention and the client was pretty disappointed.”
      • “We need to remember this is a professional environment, . . . and not be too casual.”
      •  “I think there is a lot of cost-saving in the virtual world.”
  • Question on arbitrators pushing hearing forward virtually, even if that might not be best for the client.
    • Panelist J. Michael McNutt, senior litigation advisor and of counsel at the Paris law firm of Lazareff Le Bars:
      • ADR for his clients, who invest in multi-jurisdiction projects, virtual hearings adds a lot more complexity, said McNutt.
      • He said he has been working under new International Chamber of Commerce Court of Arbitration pandemic policies, which in certain circumstances pushes virtual hearings when the matter is not ready or too complex. For example, in one matter, among other logistical cross-border concerns, the parties needed translations for four languages. With due process considerations, the parties he is representing will proceed, but they will reserve their rights, noting also that there is a counterclaim.  “With international arbitration, it is a lot more complex.”
      • Moderator Reyes asked about cross-examination over video as opposed to in-person. McNutt replied, “It is very very difficult to have an effective cross examination because you can’t assume the other side is going to be honest or act properly.  You have to put another body in the room.” He says he is concerned about protecting the integrity of the proceeding.
  • Question: Are hearings different than mediations virtually?
    • Ostolaza:
      • “I wholeheartedly agree . . . that when it comes to depositions and . . . a hearing with live witnesses that you are cross examining it is very difficult.”
      • At a minimum, the attorney has a right to be with the client in person, and the other side should be socially distanced.    
      • Mediators can juggle multiple rooms better virtually than in person, knocking on doors and waiting.
  • Question to Tom Roberts of Boeing: What is one thing missing from the virtual mediation as opposed to the in-person mediation? Moderator Ana Reyes proposes that the key missing element is the mediator’s power to communicate with the individuals.  
    • Roberts:
      • “The best value that the mediator can bring” is to “credibly deliver the substance of . . . his or her view of the merits of the legal claims.”  He added, “that communicates pretty well virtually.”
      • On the downside, “there is a bit of easy-come, easy-go with virtual mediations.” No travel needed, just click in and click out, he said, concluding that it is easier now for parties to stop mediating.
      • A mediator that is committed to the process will have the people skills to stop today, but will catch up with the parties after—a mediator who wants to see it through.
    • Ostolaza:
      • She said her matters are starting earlier, with three or four calls before the actual mediation day, to go through the parameters and make the client feel comfortable so that the mediation will work.
      • For arbitration hearings, she advises practicing on exhibits and the process with the tribunal administrator
  • Question: Mediations don’t generally occur in international arbitrations—for example, the ICC does not require pre-mediations–perhaps because of a lack of availability of mediators that can work on the cross-cultural issues at play. Discuss these cultural factors.
    • J. Michael McNutt:
      • The reason the firm has offices in Dubai is for Chinese investors investing in Africa, who use arbitration in Abu Dhabi, in the United Arab Emirates, for those disputes.
      • The mentality and the civil law upon entering the contract is a fundamental issue when you have to interpret the contract in these international cases. In mediation it is difficult to find someone that “both parties would agree could accurately boil down” the essence of the dispute. He says that he cannot find qualified mediators– “Mediation is tough.”
      • For international mediation to become more relevant, it needs the ability to address these broad issues.
  • Question to Tom Roberts: Boeing is an international entity–Is that something Boeing has had to face, cross-cultural issues?
    • Roberts:
      • He agrees with McNutt, saying, “If you can find the right person then there is real value [to mediation].”
      • “The cultural differences, expectations, [and] legal understandings are very different in different parts of the world, so [finding the right person is] a big challenge.”
  • Question: Is there some loss in connecting in mediations virtually?
    • Ostolaza:
      • “There are differences in America” in negotiate style depending on the part of the country. “The art of being a great lawyer is understanding and embracing those differences and being good at it and being able to be a chameleon.”
      • She said she and her clients had discussions after virtual mediations by staying on the video for purposes of recapping client communications.
      • There can be a lack of buy-in without the travel and the commitment of an in-person mediation. But the counter is that it was “a little bit” friendlier not being in the same room with participants “hating” each other.  It counterbalanced.
  • Question: Often at the end of a mediation, noted Mediator Reyes, the mediator will ask parties to sign on to the terms of the mediation so the settlement will not unravel.  How have you addressed the technical request to sign on to the terms?
    • Ostolaza:
      • She had a term sheet at the outset for one pandemic mediation—she says she brings one to every mediation—and the parties were able to sign it two days after the conclusion of the session.
      • In another recent case, the mediation term sheet was signed with DocuSign—virtually–and no one left until it was done. That, she said, was the agreement about the deal going into the session, and it worked.
  • Question: Do you have a feeling that a couple years from now we will see a developing body of law about awards being enforced that were made in a virtual hearing?
    • McNutt:
      • If necessary, he says his firm will resist enforcement if it serves their clients.
      • He says he is a proponent of civil law issues, but in cross-border disputes, it is about the will of the parties and not the type of analysis of a common-law setting.
      • In a virtual hearing, he said, you do not know if the other lawyer is sitting across the table handing the answer to the witnesses. We have that problem even in in person hearings, said McNutt.
      • He said he looks forward to challenging the validity of awards where due process rights were abused, for example, in France, where process is fundamental to enforcement. Such challenges are “not good for arbitration,” he conceded, because finality of the award is the core reason clients turn to arbitration.
      • Tribunals need to render awards that can be enforced.
      • “The tribunal works for the parties, . . . and people need to hold tribunals accountable,” he said, for producing awards that can be enforced.
  • Question: A new issue developing, med-arb, in which you have a session with a single mediator and if a claim does not settle, then the mediator becomes the sole arbitrator, converting the matter to an arbitration from mediation. Comments?
    • Yvette Ostolaza:
      • She said she was not in a med-arb matter, but a client as part of the mediation agreed that if there is a dispute the neutral would arbitrate the mediation issues covered. She said she thought it would not work, because the mediator would think the entire time to protect himself. “I am not a fan,” she said, “Heck, I am not a fan of doing the federal magistrates’ [mediation] when they are mandatory and then going to the federal judge,” noting that she is skeptical that they will refrain from talking as the magistrate sheds the settlement role and the judge moves in to adjudicate.
    • Tom Roberts:
      • “I am generally down on the idea, but it also sort of depends on what the alternative is.” He agreed with Ostolaza’s concerns. It is impossible to not have the arbitrator contaminated by what they learned in the mediation process, said, adding he might be open to med-arb in a smaller case “where you really just want to get an answer.”
  • Moderator Reyes noted a 2021 CPR Annual Meeting chat comment advising that mediation is an old process with deep tribal roots that is common in most indigenous populations.
    • J. Michael McNutt:
      • “Mediation works when the community has already established who the mediator should be. That’s fundamentally different than a judge, of course.”
      • The skillset for arbitration: “We are hired to protect our clients and defend and win in the client’s interest. Prior to commencing arbitration there is a conversation of what is the client’s interests so that we know what they are and what to fight for.”
      • To mediate in arbitration is different, concluded McNutt, adding that the skillset is different.

* * *

The author, a third-year student at New York’s Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, is a CPR 2021 intern. Videos from #CPRAM21 will be posted soon at www.cpradr.org.

[END]

Love’s New Mediation Data: Whither the Joint Session?

By Temitope Akande

New York Law School’s Alternative Dispute Resolution Skills Program kicked off its first 2021 round of biweekly Wednesday lunch conversations yesterday featuring mediator Lela Porter Love, a law professor and director of the Kukin Program for Conflict Resolution at New York’s Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law.

Love opened by emphatically noting that dialogue is currently dying or impoverished, even on the political scene. Mediation, she said, “is the last bastion,” with mediators trained to promote dialogue. But even in mediation, there is “less and less mandate for mediators to bring parties together into joint sessions.”

Her discussion was mostly based on a 2019 survey of practicing mediators in a professional group, the International Academy of Mediators, to determine the use of joint and caucus sessions. Presenting a PowerPoint, “The Disappearing Joint Session,” based on 129 responses and anecdotal discussions, Love said that the data reflects the title: There is a lessening frequency of the use of joint sessions and more reliance on mediators conducting caucuses with individual parties.

Prof. Love moved to a 2017 survey by the American Bar Association Dispute Resolution Section Task Force on the Relation of Mediator Actions to Mediation Outcomes also on the use of caucus during mediation. The results, she said, were counterintuitive: caucusing had an increased settlement effect in labor-management disputes, but no effect, according to her presentation slide, “in other types of disputes regardless of [the] purpose of caucus (i.e., whether to establish trust or discuss settlement proposals).”

She said that the use of caucus has shown that parties are more likely to file an enforcement action based on their settlement—which indicates that increased caucusing didn’t reduce acrimony. As a result, caucus sessions, while they may increase labor-management case settlement, may have potential for negative effects on the parties’ perceptions and relationships.

Love discussed the caucusing results in a broad Maryland state judiciary ADR evaluation report. Based on the evaluation of caucus sessions, the greater the percentage of time participants spent in caucus, the less likely the parties were satisfied with the outcome, and the less likely the participants report that the issues “were resolved with a fair and implementable outcome.”

“On balance,” said Love, “you don’t see this real, ‘Wow, now I understand why there is this great move to caucusing.’”

The Maryland study showed that when the mediators controlled the sessions, limiting the issues instead of presenting a broad range, parties showed an increase in a desire to better understand the other party. The long-term aftereffects results show that the greater percentage of time participants spent in caucus, the more likely participants will return to court for an enforcement action after mediation, reflecting a lack of durability of those mediation results.

Love further discussed the values that influence mediation style and reasons why mediators use caucus sessions instead of joint sessions, returning to the IAM study. First, mediators who do not use joint sessions primarily do not do so because attorneys do not want joint sessions.

The second reason they lean toward caucus and away from joint sessions is that parties tend to decline joint sessions because they feel more comfortable participating in the mediation process by sharing their stories in caucus sessions with the mediator, rather than facing their adversary. “People in conflict are really angry at each other and they don’t want to see each other,” explained Love.

Love further noted that mediators were mostly trained to use joint sessions, though different schools of mediation also favored caucuses. A more important factor in constructing and conducting mediation sessions is that a significant purpose is to get people together to heal relationships—as opposed to the “war” of adjudication–which orients toward using joint sessions.

Prof. Love concluded by stressing that listening helps settle cases, and it is important in helping people tell their stories. The mediators who seek to identify the parties’ interests perhaps are doing only one aspect of the process, noted NYLS ADR Skills Program Director and moderator F. Peter Phillips, who added that mediation might be better handled if the emphasis was on all parties listening and working to understand one another. Love concurred, and, noting that mediators are witnesses to the participants’ stories, suggested that neutrals provide “respectful-person listening” that enhances the process.

Love’s Jan. 13 NYLS Conversations in Conflict Resolution session is available on YouTube at https://bit.ly/3nOluyK.

* * *

The author, who received a Master of Laws in Alternative Dispute Resolution last May at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law in Los Angeles, is volunteering with the CPR Institute through Spring 2021.

[END]

How Litigants View the ADR Options in Courts

By Alice Albl

At the Sept. 17 online CPR Institute Mediation Committee meeting, University of California, Davis, School of Law School Prof. Donna Shestowsky presented her research about the role courts play in encouraging alternative dispute resolution over a trial.

The study revealed that litigants seem to be unaware of ADR options when going to court, although knowing about some of these options—specifically, mediation–improve litigants’ opinions of the court itself.

This lack of awareness stayed relatively consistent among demographics, even among those with legal representation.  

“Repeat player” litigants were less likely than first timers to report uncertainty or confusion whether ADR options were available.

Shestowsky’s research observed the experiences of more than 350 litigants spread among the court systems of three different states.

The first system, in California, allowed litigants to choose between a trial, or opting into mediation or arbitration.

The second system, in Utah, assigned mediation as the default option but allowed litigants to convert their cases into an arbitration or trial.

The third system, in Oregon, statutorily required nonbinding arbitration for cases involving amounts in controversy less than $50,000. Litigants could opt-out by filing a “Motion for Exemption from Arbitration,” or by agreeing with their opposition to enter mediation.

All three court systems posted information online about available ADR programs and kept a list of approved neutrals on file. None required attorneys to educate their clients about the available ADR options.

Litigants in the study took a survey before and after their journey through the courts. The questions sought to gauge litigants’ awareness about relevant court-sponsored ADR programs, whether legal representation affected their awareness, and how awareness of court-sponsored ADR affected litigants’ opinions of the court offering the options.

The data Shestowsky reaped from these surveys revealed some unexpected findings. While roughly half of the litigants were unsure whether mediation and arbitration were available to them, another 20% wrongly stated these options were unavailable.

Without knowledge of the court systems’ sponsorship for mediation or arbitration, litigants most often considered negotiation as a means for dispute resolution, even before the prospect of a trial.  

While about a third of litigants considered mediation, knowing that the method was a court-sponsored option generally improved their opinion of the sponsoring court system.

Arbitration was only considered by about one quarter of the litigants, and knowledge of court sponsorship did little to affect litigants’ opinions of sponsoring courts. Shestowsky attributed this to the possibility that litigants had low opinions of arbitration as an option for their court-filed cases, which aligned with findings from her past research.

Having a lawyer did not make litigants more aware of ADR options, even when those options were offered, or even mandated, by the court system.

Shestowsky pointed out this universally low awareness rate of ADR options as an issue to address among courts, especially given how awareness seemed to improve court favorability.

One possible solution would be rules that require attorneys to properly educate clients about ADR options before engaging the courts, which could be enforced using penalty fees or an affidavit.

Shestowsky also suggested that courts implement “direct education.” This could involve bolstered advertisement of ADR options, a dedicated ADR helpdesk, and periodic information sessions. The professor, who serves as UC Davis School of Law’s Director of the Lawyering Skills Education Program, even envisioned an artificial intelligence-powered digital aide that could recommend options based on litigants’ specific needs.

While Shestowsky cautioned that her research focusing on three court systems may not perfectly reflect the general state of ADR awareness, the consistency of data among the diverse systems could point to a greater trend. To gauge this, the professor recommended that courts across the nation buck the trend of measuring success for ADR programs by their usage rates, and first look to their awareness rates by surveying those who do not use their ADR programs.

* * *

Donna Shestowsky previously discussed her research at “New Research Sheds Light on How Litigants Evaluate the Characteristics of Legal Procedures,” 34 Alternatives 145 (November 2016) (available at https://bit.ly/2ScA71w), which adapted and updated material from Donna Shestowsky, “How Litigants Evaluate the Characteristics of Legal Procedures: A Multi-Court Empirical Study,” 49 U.C. Davis L. Rev. 3 (2016) (available at http://ssrn.com/abstract=2729893).

* * *

The author, a CPR Institute Fall 2020 intern, is a second-year student at Brooklyn Law School in New York.

Updating the Global Pound Conference: A Survey on Mediation in Cross-Border Disputes

By Angela Cipolla

The recent Report on International Mediation and Enforcement Mechanisms found that, while mediation survey respondents believe in the necessity of using the process for cross-border disputes, a lack of education about how mediation works is a problem.

The report’s results also strongly boost calls for an international mediation enforcement mechanism.

The recent report was issued by the Institute for Dispute Resolution, at New Jersey City University’s School of Business in Jersey City, N.J., to the International Mediation Institute for the benefit of delegates attending the UNCITRAL Working Group II (Dispute Settlement) 67th Session, on dispute settlement, which was held last month in Vienna. For more information, see www.imimediation.org.

The report follows and incorporates results of surveying done at the Global Pound Conference, which concluded a year of face-to-face meetings with practitioners worldwide in July. See http://globalpound.org; for a wrap-up of the GPC series, see CPR Speaks blog post at http://bit.ly/2vxV2P1.  The IMI and NJCU IDR surveys received responses from users in various fields and professions that represented, according to respondents who identified their locations, 24 countries.

The information was collected in the 28 GPC events held in 22 countries, as well as through online voting. Votes were categorized by stakeholders.

The report, written by David S. Weiss, director of the Institute for Dispute Resolution and a visiting scholar at the New Jersey City University’s business school, and New Jersey attorney Michael R. Griffith, analyzed views on establishing an international treaty for the enforcement of mediated settlements collected online from June 2016 to March 2017; it also analyzed responses from the Global Pound Conference Survey, which was available at IMI Global Pound Conference gatherings and online from March 2016 to September.

The report also expands upon how the international legal and business communities use mediation.  See S.I. Strong, “Use and Perception of International Commercial Mediation and Conciliation: A Preliminary Report on Issues Relating to the Proposed UNCITRAL Convention on International Commercial Mediation and Conciliation,” U. of Missouri School of Law Legal Studies Research Paper (Nov. 17, 2014)(available at http://bit.ly/2yAzUhp).

Overview

Weiss and Griffith gathered the opinions of “those who are most likely affected by the adoption of any prospective drafts or proposals by Working Group II (Dispute Settlement) with emphasis on the users.” The views, reflecting 103 survey responses, reflect the “wider business community, their advisors, providers, and those that may influence the mediation space,” they write. The GPC conference and online surveying produced responses from about 2,500 stakeholders.

The report follows the same pedagogical and methodological process as Strong’s article, presenting research “gathered by an international quantitative-qualitative study of users’ assessments of the enforcement of international commercial settlement agreements resulting from conciliation.”

The Report’s Findings

With regard to the report’s own survey questions, the study brought to light a lack of education regarding the benefits and uses of mediation in cross-border disputes. It found that 40% of the respondents said they use or have been advised to use mediation in a cross-border dispute as a best practice in business “infrequently,” and 24% answered “not at all.”

When users were asked why they thought parties do not resolve their commercial cross-border disputes through mediation, the most frequent answer at 57% of the responses was that “they are unfamiliar with mediation.”

The study called the result “a surprisingly [sic] lack of knowledge about mediation among users.”

These results demonstrate a need for more education about mediation. Interestingly, the second highest-ranked reason in response to the question was that no universal mechanism to enforce a mediated settlement exists.

While the IMI and NJCU survey also showed “a general positive direction of users to incorporate mediation clauses into cross-border contracts,” 80% of users were even more apt to participate in mediation if there was a uniform global mechanism to enforce mediation settlements in place.

This demonstrates the incentive that such a mechanism would provide and the possible positive effects it would have on mediation use in cross-border disputes.

Accordingly, the report found that the majority of users and stakeholders in both the study conducted for the report and the GPC surveying “believe that a uniform global mechanism to enforce mediation settlements would improve commercial dispute resolution.”

Some concerns regarding faith and trust in the mediation process were raised in the IMI and NJCU study’s comments, suggesting that more confidence in the process needs to be built as the use of mediation becomes more prevalent.

The report also looked to whether a treaty should include provisions similar to the longstanding Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards, better known as the New York Convention.

This idea was well received. An overwhelming 84% of users stated that they would be “more likely” to use or increase their use of mediation in a cross-border dispute if there were a uniform global mechanism in place, similar to the New York Convention, which would ensure enforcements of settlement agreements.

The report speculates that a majority of users would like to use the uniform mechanism as a “bargaining chip;” 60% of users stated that they would prefer an “opt-in” system.

Additionally, the report examined the challenges users faced in mediation. When asked whether users faced any post-mediation challenges to settlement agreements in cross-border disputes on the grounds of capacity, duress, or fraud, the two largest recorded answers were 47%, responding “never,” and 36% responding, “sometimes.”

The report also asked users whether they would be less likely to use mediation if a uniform global mechanism of enforcement included any defenses.  The question didn’t show that defenses would have a significant impact on a user’s willingness. Forty-four percent of the users responded “no,” while 27% responded “yes.”

When asked if the users would prefer a uniform global mechanism that limited defenses, similar to the New York Convention’s Article V, 54% of users responded “yes,” while 22% responded “no.”

The report also revealed that though re-litigating settlements doesn’t occur often, the rate was high.  The study found that 35% of users answered “infrequently” when asked if they have ever were required to re-litigate on general contract defense a mediation settlement agreement that was not honored. “If this was not a problem,” the authors wrote, “we would expect to see user’s answering ‘infrequently’ at a much lower percentage.”

This indicates a problem that a global enforcement mechanism might help alleviate. Additionally, regarding the availability of mediators, the report showed that “[w]hile it is generally positive that 61% of users are generally able to find qualified mediators, there [is] a vast amount of room for improvement.”

In addition to its own questions, the report also analyzed the GPC Series Questions. The report found that just like the users in its study, a majority of GPC stakeholders “believe that a uniform global mechanism to enforce mediation settlements would improve commercial dispute resolution, with 51% [of users concurring.]”

Overall, the GPC Series Questions had a positive view of taking action on mediation settlement enforcement.  Those conference and web survey questions found 51% of users “clearly supporting a uniform global mechanism to enforce mediation settlements as their first preference.”

* * *

The report concludes that global enforcement of mediation settlement agreements is a “necessary tool for encouraging mediation,” and that such an enforcement mechanism should be “congruent with the methodological approach that was adopted by the arbitration community through the New York Convention.”

The report further emphasizes that “practical certainty” in mediated settlement agreements will (1) improve access to justice and (2) “increase efficiency for the wider business community,” and that both of these benefits are crucial to advance trading systems and aide businesses.

UNCITRAL’s Working Group II’s 68th session, expected to consider a mediation enforcement convention further, is scheduled to be held in New York, from Feb. 5 – 9.

* * *

The author is a Fall 2017 CPR Institute Intern.

The EU Mediation Blues: Is there a way to resolve the EU Mediation “Paradox”?

javierBy Javier Fernández-Samaniego

Almost ten years have elapsed since the European Union adopted the Mediation Directive (2008/52/EC) in civil and commercial matters, and four years since the European Parliament acknowledged the so-called “EU Mediation Paradox” [1] in its study “‘Rebooting’ the mediation directive”. The study drew attention to the lack of significant development of mediation, utilized only in less than an average 1% of the cases in courts of Member States in the EU, despite its high success and satisfaction rates when used.

As rightly pointed out in the Report from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council and the European Economic and Social Committee on the application of Directive 2008/52/EC (Aug 2016)[2], due to the “unofficial” nature of mediation compared to formal court proceedings, it is very difficult to obtain comprehensive statistical data on mediation such as the profile of companies using mediation, number of mediated cases, the average length and success rates of mediation processes.

In what seems to be a fresh verse in the EU Mediation blues song, a new Resolution of 12 September 2017 on the implementation of the EU Mediation Directive (2008/52/EC) issued by the European Parliament[3] notes that certain difficulties exist in relation to the functioning of the national mediation systems in practice. These difficulties are mainly rooted in the adversarial tradition and the lack of a “mediation culture” in the Member States, the low level of awareness of mediation in most Member States, insufficient knowledge of how to deal with cross-border cases and the functioning of the quality control mechanisms for mediators.

In this Resolution, the European Parliament has made the following recommendations:

  1. EU Member States should boost awareness of how useful mediation is and step up their efforts to encourage the use of mediation in civil and commercial disputes, such as through information campaigns, improved cooperation between legal professionals and an exchange of best practices in the different local jurisdictions of EU.
  2. The Commission should assess the need to develop EU-wide quality standards for the provision of mediation services, especially in the form of minimum standards ensuring consistency, while considering the fundamental right of access to justice.
  3. The Commission should assess the need for Member States to create national registers of mediated proceedings as useful sources of information for Commission and mediators across Europe.
  4. The Commission should undertake a detailed study on the obstacles to the free circulation of foreign mediation agreements in the Union and on various options to promote the use of mediation as a sound, affordable and effective way to solve conflicts in internal and cross-border disputes in the Union, considering the rule of law and ongoing international developments in this field.

Lastly, in an apparent call for new rules, the Parliament requests that the Commission offer solutions to extend the scope of mediation to other civil or administrative matters in future regulation and highlights that, despite the voluntary nature of mediation, further steps must be taken to ensure the enforceability of mediated agreements in a quick and affordable manner.

On the brighter side, there are some less worried notes to the EU Mediation blues tune since the Parliament also welcomes the Commission’s dedication to co-financing various projects aimed at the promotion of mediation and training for judges and practitioners in the Member States. It appears that, after ten years’ investment in civil and commercial mediation since the Directive has been adopted, the perseverance will pay off.

The International Institute for Conflict Prevention and Resolution (CPR) through its European Advisory Board is working hard to fulfill the agreed-upon objectives and has recently published a guide for European corporates and organizations on the use of mediation and other ADR processes [4] that includes resources and practices to help identify disputes suitable for ADR and make the most out of them. The Guide also includes several successful case studies. There is no doubt that such efforts will eventually turn the moody blues of EU mediation into a happier upbeat melody.

FOOTNOTES:

[1] See the European Parliament’s study: “‘Rebooting’ the mediation directive”: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/document.html?reference=IPOL-JURI_ET(2014)493042

[2] Report from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council and the European Economic and Social Committee on the application of Directive 2008/52/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on certain aspects of mediation in civil and commercial matters. Brussels, 26.8.2016 COM(2016) 542 final http://ec.europa.eu/justice/civil/files/act_part1_adopted_en.pdf

[3] http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//TEXT+TA+P8-TA-2017-0321+0+DOC+XML+V0//EN&language=EN

[4] https://www.cpradr.org/resource-center/toolkits/european-mediation-adr-guide

 

Javier Fernández-Samaniego is the Managing Director of the IberoAmerican law firm SAMANIEGO LAW with offices in Madrid and Miami (for Latin America) and head of its Commercial, Dispute Resolution and Tech & Comms team. He regularly serves as an arbitrator and mediator of complex international disputes and he is a member of the Institute’s CPR Panel of Distinguished Neutral and of CPR European Advisory Board. He can be reached at javier.samaniego@samaniegolaw.com.

 

JAMS Disputes NJ’s Classification of its Operations as the Practice of Law

By Elena Gurevich

Earlier this month the New Jersey Supreme Court granted a cert petition request by JAMS, the nation’s largest private alternative dispute resolution provider, giving the organization a chance to argue that the retired lawyers and judges who serve on its neutrals’ panels are not practicing law, and therefore do not have to comply with all the state’s requirements for doing so.

In August 2016, JAMS filed a request for an advisory opinion from three New Jersey Supreme Court committees as to whether it could open an office to provide neutral services “without the requirements of a law office practice.”

Having reviewed the committee and Court opinions that guide New Jersey law practice, JAMS concluded that so long as its ADR office is “maintained as a business which does not offer or advertise traditional legal services where there is an attorney-client relationship, this business may be independently maintained, even though staffed by retired judges and lawyers who act as Neutrals in providing ADR services such as mediation, arbitration and the like and are held out to the public using the designation retired judge or ‘Esq.’ for lawyer neutrals.”

JAMS is a nearly 40-year-old Irvine, Calif.-based firm that focuses on mediating and arbitrating complex business and commercial cases via its panel of neutrals. See www.jamsadr.com. The ADR provider has offices in 14 states, the District of Columbia, and in London and Toronto.

JAMS agreed that its New Jersey lawyer-neutrals are subject to the Rules of Professional Conduct for lawyers, but argued that the New Jersey requirements for a traditional law practice “are not necessary for the provision of neutral services in the state.”

On May 1, 2017, three New Jersey Supreme Court advisory committees—the Advisory Committee on Professional Ethics, the Committee on the Unauthorized Practice of Law and the Committee on Attorney Advertising—responded to JAMS’ request with a joint advisory letter decision that says that the state’s ethics rules apply to the provider.

The consequences of the determination are that JAMS would need to open a bona fide office in the state, and maintain a trust account.

Predominantly relying upon ACPE Opinion 676/CAA Opinion 18 (April 1994)(available at http://bit.ly/2hRLF7E), the joint committee decision advised that, because the lawyers and retired judges at JAMS work as third-party neutrals, they are engaged in the practice of law and as such must “comply with the rules governing lawyers in private practice.”

On June 30, JAMS filed a petition to New Jersey Supreme Court seeking review of the joint decision. JAMS asserted that as a provider of “non-traditional legal services” it does not establish any attorney-client relationship.

The state’s top Court granted the petition on Oct. 4.

In the petition, JAMS cited a University of Baltimore law review article asserting that mediation “is not the practice of law because it is not illegal for non-lawyers to be mediators.” Robert Rubinson, “The New Maryland Rules of Professional Conduct and Mediation: Perplexing Questions Answered and

Perplexing Questions That Remain,” University of Baltimore Law Forum Vol. 36: No. 1, Article 2 at 12 (available at http://bit.ly/2yEf8fk).

The article also emphasizes the definition of mediation that involves mediators “who, without providing legal advice, assist the parties in reaching their own voluntary agreement.” That, according to the article, signified the fact that under Maryland law mediators are not practicing law.

In its joint answer brief prepared by the state attorney general’s office and filed Aug. 30, the Supreme Court committees reject the argument. saying that the Maryland law “carries no weight in New Jersey” since the jurisdiction uses a different analysis when it tries to determine if someone has engaged in the unauthorized practice of law. It explains that New Jersey “first decides whether an activity constitutes the practice of law; it then considers whether, if non-lawyers engage in that activity, it is in the public interest to permit them to continue.”

The joint answer also notes that the attorney-client relationship was “immaterial to the issue.” Instead, it focuses on the public interest and regulation of neutral services, saying it was “germane to the Committees ‘ analysis.”

According to the joint answer, the Court committees “sufficiently addressed” the public interest concerns in their decision, pointing out that JAMS’ “expressly markets its neutrals’ legal experience and skill through their roles as lawyers and retired judges.” The committees expressed their concern that JAMS’ prospective customers “are entitled to rely on that experience and those designations in their selection of a neutral, calling for proper regulation of “these individuals.”

JAMS filed a Sept. 18 reply brief arguing that “[p]ermission for N.J. admitted lawyers and retired judges to conduct a neutral practice under the JAMS umbrella does not diminish regulatory oversight or the public interest.”

JAMS asserted that it mentioned the Maryland law review article simply to “illustrate the shift by other courts throughout the nation towards acceptance of the provision of neutral services as not being tantamount to the practice of law.  . . .”

JAMS also underscored that it did not “seek to redefine how ADR practice in New Jersey fits into law,” asking the court to recognize that practice has evolved immensely over the past 20 years since Joint Opinion 676, discussed above, was issued.

The ADR provider drew the court’s attention to the dichotomy Joint Opinion 676 presented. According to the reply brief, “an ADR neutral’s practice is a part of law practice,” but the joint opinion simultaneously recognizes that non-admitted lawyers and other professionals also may practice in the field. JAMS opined, “It would be helpful and in the public interest for the court to address this dichotomy.”

JAMS expects to file a supplemental brief on or before Nov. 13, according to its attorney, Robert Margulies, of Jersey City, NJ’s Margulies & Wind. The joint committee’s response brief would be due on or before Dec.18.

The Court’s acceptance of the case was first reported in Michael Booth, “Justices Will Hear JAMS Challenge to NJ Ethics Rules,” N.J.L.J. (Oct. 10)(available at http://bit.ly/2hSuMdg).

 

The author, who has just completed her L.L.M. with a focus on IP law at Cardozo School of Law in New York, is a 2017 CPR Institute Fall Intern.

Celebrate with CPR – Mediation Week: Oct. 15-21, 2017

fireworksSMALL

Celebrate Mediation Week 2017!

Of course, it’s always a good time for mediation, but CPR will be joining numerous other organizations next month to formally celebrate this effective means of preventing and resolving disputes, at Mediation Week 2017: “Mediation, Civility and the Power of Understanding, organized by the American Bar Association Section of Dispute Resolution. Please join us, won’t you?

Tuesday, October 17 – Open Forum on (In)Civility in Mediation

The CPR Institute’s Mediation Committee invites all who are interested to participate in a convenient and open-to-the-public Lunchtime Teleconference on Tuesday, October 17th, 2017 from 12:30-1:30 pm ET. Distinguished mediator and CPR panelist, Jack P. Levin, will recount some of the lessons and inevitable trials encountered in his years striving for greater civility in mediation. This dialogue will be followed by an opportunity for caller participation.

While there has been research on the cost of incivility to corporations, we will explore the effects of this behavior in the mediation process, along with strategies for promoting civility in negotiations. We hope you will join us, prepared to share any anecdotes or observations on the effects of civility (and lack thereof!) in dispute settlement. To register, contact zchanin@cpradr.org. You will be provided dial-in information and links to supplementary material upon registration.

The Mediation Committee is a consortium of CPR members throughout the world.  We are currently exploring ways to enhance the quality and effectiveness of corporate mediation practice, both domestically and internationally.  The Co-Chairs of the Committee are Erin Gleason, of Gleason Alvarez ADR, and Rick Richardson, of GlaxoSmithKline. 

Wednesday, October 18 – Mediation Settlement Day

CPR has been invited to speak on a panel as part of the Mediation Settlement Day Kick-Off Event on October 18, 2017 from 4:30 pm – 7:30 pm at New York Law School, 185 West Broadway in New York City.

The focus of this event will be “Diversity and Inclusion in Dispute Resolution, 2.0.” Following an open house and a remembrance of Margaret Shaw, panelists Maurice Robinson, Esq. (Moderator), CPR’s Niki Borofsky, Esq., John D. Feerick, Esq., Rekha Rangachari, Esq. and Maria Volpe, Ph.D. will discuss:

  • What is Diversity and Inclusion in Dispute Resolution?
  • How are bar associations, professional organizations, court-connected dispute resolution programs and community dispute resolution centers addressing diversity and inclusion in the field?
  • A New CLE Category: Diversity, Inclusion and the Elimination of Bias
  • Current opportunities for diverse mediators

The evening will conclude with the Frontline Champion Award Presentation and a Keynote address by John Kiernan, Esq. of Debevoise & Plimpton on Diversity and Inclusion. For more information and to register click HERE.

Tuesday, October 24 – CPR Webinar on Including Effective ADR Clauses in Contracts

Admittedly, this date is slightly outside of the formal “Mediation Week,” but we’re going to squeeze it in and keep on celebrating with this CPR members-only event, being hosted by the Fundamentals Task Force of the CPR Transactional Dispute Prevention and Solutions Committee on October 24, 2017, from 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm ET.

All transactional lawyers would benefit from an understanding of how various forms of dispute resolution can be included in contracts and other agreements. We help to accomplish this through our easily used online CPR Clause Selection Tool. Michael B. Keating of Foley Hoag LLP will demonstrate a method to train transactional lawyers to craft an appropriate ADR contract clause using this tool. Following this session, attendees will be able to do the same for their colleagues. The program will qualify for one hour of New York CLE credit–details to follow. 

For more information and to register for the CPR members-only event, click HERE or email Zoe Chanin at zchanin@cpradr.org.

And for more information about Mediation Week 2017, please visit the ABA event website HERE.

EU Court Backs Mandatory Mediation Referral

By Ugonna Kanu

The Court of Justice of the European Union, which rules on cases between members of the European Union often involving treaties, issued a significant opinion on compulsory consumer ADR earlier this year.

Advocate General Henrik Saugmandsgaard Øe, who prepared the ruling, supported an Italian national law that compels consumers to mediate as a precondition for bringing legal proceedings in the Italian courts.

At the same time, the opinion suggests that parties may determine their own fate without a lawyer, overruling an Italian law requiring that a litigant use an attorney to mediate their case.

The EU Court of Justice opinion was based on a request for a preliminary ruling from the District Court in Verona, Italy.  Menini v. Banco Popolare – Società Cooperativa, Case C-75/16 (February 16, 2017)(Available at http://bit.ly/2usImgu).

In the case, a dispute arose between a bank and two clients concerning the performance of a mortgage contract. The bank obtained a court order against the consumers to pay the required sum.

The consumers appealed the order to the Verona district court and sought to have its provisional enforcement suspended.  The district court found that the parties making the appeal must, in order for the appeal to be admissible, use a mediation procedure in accordance with the national law.

But questions arose whether the national law that forces consumers to mediate as a pre-condition to judicial proceedings; mandates legal representation of consumers in a mediation, or penalizes a party from withdrawing from a mediation without valid reason, was incompatible with the EU consumer ADR directives.

The District Court decided to stay its proceedings and to refer the questions to the Court of Justice for a preliminary ruling.

The EU court mostly backed the mediation requirements.

According to the 2013 EU directives, the opinion noted, consumer ADR mechanisms are voluntary.  But they do not preclude “any national rules making the participation of [parties] in such procedures mandatory or subject to incentives or sanctions or making their outcome binding on parties, provided that such legislation does not prevent the parties from exercising their right of access to the judicial system.” Recital No. 49, Directive 2013/11/EU  of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013 on alternative dispute resolution for consumer disputes and amending Regulation (EC) No. 2006/2004 and Directive 2009/22/EC)(available at http://bit.ly/2jv7LjA).

Accordingly, Advocate General Saugmandsgaard, in his ruling, held on one hand, that the Italian law was compatible with the EU directives to the extent it does not deny the consumers access to the judiciary and that the limitation period does not expire during such mediation process.

On the other hand, however, the ruling precludes national legislation which mandates consumers to be assisted by lawyers, or penalizes consumers who withdraw from the mediation process without valid grounds (unless the concept of “valid grounds” includes the party simply being dissatisfied with the ADR procedure).

The author is an attorney in Nigeria who has just completed her L.L.M. in Dispute Resolution at the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Law.  She is a CPR Institute 2017 summer intern.