Gov Cuomo Signs New Legislation Barring Use of Mandatory Arbitration to Resolve Workplace Discrimination and Harassment in New York State

By Anna Hershenberg

As expected, on Monday, August 12, 2019, Governor Cuomo signed new legislation that, among other things, purports to bar the use of mandatory arbitration to resolve discrimination and harassment cases in the workplace in New York state.

The prior version of this law, New York CPLR § 7515, which went into effect last year, aimed to prohibit mandatory arbitration of workplace sexual harassment claims only; this version expands the prohibition to claims of other types of discrimination.

In June, Judge Denise Cote (SDNY) found the prior version of  § 7515 to be preempted by the Federal Arbitration Act and therefore invalid. (Latif v. Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC et al. (S.D.N.Y. 2019) (available at http://bit.ly/2y9w6AL)) Her ruling should apply with equal force to the amended version of § 7515, at least with respect to interstate matters.

CPR covered this issue earlier this month on CPRSpeaks:

https://blog.cpradr.org/2019/08/01/update-legislatures-on-invalidating-pre-dispute-arbitration-agreements/

The full text of the newly enacted § 7515 is pasted below (revisions in blue).

Section 7515: Mandatory arbitration clauses; prohibited

(a) Definitions. As used in this section:

1. The term “employer” shall have the same meaning as provided in subdivision five of section two hundred ninety-two of the executive law.

2. The term “prohibited clause” shall mean any clause or provision in any contract which requires as a condition of the enforcement of the contract or obtaining remedies under the contract that the parties submit to mandatory arbitration to resolve any allegation or claim of an unlawful discriminatory practice of sexual harassment. discrimination, in violation of laws prohibiting discrimination, including but not limited to, article fifteen of the executive law.

3. The term “mandatory arbitration clause” shall mean a term or provision contained in a written contract which requires the parties to such contract to submit any matter thereafter arising under such contract to arbitration prior to the commencement of any legal action to enforce the provisions of such contract and which also further provides language to the effect that the facts found or determination made by the arbitrator or panel of arbitrators in its application to a party alleging an unlawful discriminatory practice based on sexual harassment in violation of laws prohibiting discrimination, including but not limited to, article fifteen of the executive law shall be final and not subject to independent court review.

4. The term “arbitration” shall mean the use of a decision making forum conducted by an arbitrator or panel of arbitrators within the meaning and subject to the provisions of article seventy-five of the civil practice law and rules.

(b) (i) Prohibition. Except where inconsistent with federal law, no written contract, entered into on or after the effective date of this section shall contain a prohibited clause as defined in paragraph two of subdivision (a) of this section.

(ii) Exceptions. Nothing contained in this section shall be construed to impair or prohibit an employer from incorporating a non-prohibited clause or other mandatory arbitration provision within such contract, that the parties agree upon.

(iii) Mandatory arbitration clause null and void. Except where inconsistent with federal law, the provisions of such prohibited clause as defined in paragraph two of subdivision (a) of this section shall be null and void. The inclusion of such clause in a written contract shall not serve to impair the enforceability of any other provision of such contract.

(c) Where there is a conflict between any collective bargaining agreement and this section, such agreement shall be controlling.

Anna Hershenberg is CPR’s Vice President of Programs and Public Policy

Epic Systems vs. #MeToo: What Now?

By Anna M. Hershenberg & Sara Higgins

Panelists and audience members came together to discuss workplace dispute resolution in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Epic Systems v. Lewis decision, analyzing the impact of mandatory arbitration and class actions waivers in light of the #MeToo movement as it continues to raise awareness of the pervasive culture of sexual harassment in the workplace, and society generally.

More than 100 in-house employment counsel from Fortune 500 companies, corporate defense attorneys, counsel from the plaintiff’s bar, as well as noted academics and neutrals attended a CPR Institute mini-symposium last month on the intersection of the Supreme Court’s decision in Epic Systems v. Lewis, No. 16-285 (May 21)(available at https://bit.ly/2rWzAE8) and the #MeToo movement.

The two-panel program discussed anticipated responses from state and federal legislatures and the plaintiff’s bar, the pros and cons of mandatory arbitration for employment disputes and what makes an employment disputes program successful in light of new, competing priorities from the perspective of all stakeholders.

The event started with a CPR members-only meeting of CPR’s Employment Disputes Committee members.  The meeting featured an exclusive interview with Anil K. Chaddha, Lead Counsel of Labor, Employment and Benefits at General Motors, about his experience with employment ADR throughout his career.

The program was then opened up to the public where CPR Institute Chief Executive Officer and President Noah Hanft led off by noting that CPR is working to bridge the gap between the two sides of these types of contentious discussions, and provides an avenue for discourse and cooperation between plaintiff’s counsel and corporate defense to tackle common issues.  [Follow CPR Events at www.cpradr.org/events-classes/upcoming, on Facebook and on Twitter].

The first panel, titled “Was Epic Systems Really Epic: Responses to Epic and the Next Battlegrounds for Mandatory Arbitration,” was moderated by Washington, D.C. based neutral Mark Kantor, who is an adjunct professor at Georgetown University Law Center and a member of CPR’s Panel of Distinguished Neutrals.

Kantor broke down the Epic Systems case and discussed both its immediate impact and far-reaching implications with panelists Christopher C. Murray, a shareholder in the Indianapolis office of Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C., who co-chairs the firm’s Arbitration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Practice Group, and Fran L. Rudich, a partner in Rye Brook, N.Y.’s Klafter Olsen & Lesser.

In Epic Systems, Kantor explained, the Supreme Court upheld the enforceability of class action waivers. He noted that, in writing for the majority, Justice Neil Gorsuch concluded:

The policy may be debatable but the law is clear: Congress has instructed that arbitration agreements like those before us must be enforced as written. While Congress is of course always free to amend this judgment, we see nothing suggesting it did so in the NLRA—much less that it manifested a clear intention to displace the Arbitration Act. Because we can easily read Congress’s statutes to work in harmony, that is where our duty lies.

The panel largely agreed that, from the employer’s perspective, this holding decisively shifts the balance in favor of mandatory arbitration with class action waivers.

From the employees’ perspective, Rudich previewed the plaintiff’s bar’s anticipated response: plaintiffs’ attorneys will now make concerted efforts to bring multiple, individual cases against the same employer as a workaround to class action waivers.  Rudich warned, “be careful what you wish for,” because employers that seek to avoid class matters are going to get exactly that, numerous individual employment dispute arbitrations, potentially with repetitive evidentiary and discovery requests.

The panel also discussed the burgeoning federal and state laws taking aim at mandatory arbitration, including that more states are poised to adopt California-style private attorney general (“PAGA”) laws to supersede employment class actions.

After a brief intermission, a second panel, “Epic Systems v. #MeToo: What Now? Best Practices for Workplace Disputes Program Design,” which included Sarah E. Bouchard, a Philadelphia-based partner in Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP; Lisa J. Banks, a named partner in Washington, D.C.’s Katz, Marshall & Banks LLP; Peter J. Cahill, Executive Director and Associate General Counsel at Ernst & Young LLP in New York; Diane Dann, Senior Vice President of Employment Law at Mastercard Inc. in Purchase, N.Y., and Kathleen McKenna, a partner at event host Proskauer, took the stage to focus on practical guidance for designing workplace disputes programs in the midst of the #MeToo movement.

The panelists discussed the legal, business and public relations implications for implementing employment disputes programs with mandatory arbitration in today’s climate.  They debated whether carving sexual harassment claims out of mandatory arbitration – like Microsoft, Uber and Lyft have done — is workable solution.

The employer-side and employee-side counsel agreed that the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017’s conditioned use of nondisclosure agreements (NDAs) in sexual harassment suits may make it harder to settle these types of claims.  Because the law attempts to disincentive the use of NDAs without regard to the wishes of the victim, it forces the parties to find work-arounds to the law where (as often happens) victims do not wish to have these disputes resolved publicly.  The panelists explained that most victims don’t want to be Gretchen Carlson — the journalist and advocate who brought a 2016 sexual harassment complaint against the chairman of Fox News – but instead want to move on with their lives without calling attention to the situation.

Panelists seemed to agree generally that incorporating opt-in or opt-out clauses into workplace dispute resolution programs might be a useful tool for assault victims who aren’t interested in publicly calling out their attackers.

Some tips for preventing sexual harassment in the workplace that the panel discussed included thoroughly vetting new hires’ pasts; evaluating the corporate culture from the top down; training bystanders who witness harassment to report it, and serving less alcohol – and more water — at business functions.

The panelists concluded that the #MeToo movement is broader than just sexual harassment – it has challenged how women are treated in the workplace and how they are compensated.

The program was followed by a networking cocktail reception.

 

Hershenberg is Vice President of Programs and Public Policy at the CPR Institute. Higgins is a CPR Institute Summer 2018 intern.

Arbitration Practice After Epic Systems

By Russ Bleemer

Today’s U.S. Supreme Court decision backs the use of employer-imposed bars on class-action processes. See Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis, No. 16-285 (opinion in the consolidated cases is available at https://bit.ly/2rWzAE8).  The case is summarized on this CPR Speaks blog here: https://bit.ly/2KEuXFN,   with Justice Clarence Thomas’s concurrence summarized the blog at https://bit.ly/2wYEKEB, and Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s dissent examined on CPR Speaks here: https://bit.ly/2rXQFgT.

So what’s next?

Mandatory individual employment arbitration, with a waiver of class/collective processes, means simply that business can require employees to go it alone in addressing problems about the workplace.

A recent study found that mandatory arbitration use already had been soaring on its own over the long-term—see Alexander J.S. Colvin, “The growing use of mandatory arbitration,” Economic Policy Institute (April 6, 2018)(available at https://bit.ly/2HxgQUL–even as earlier studies found that employers prefer more conciliatory processes (see the Alternatives article cited below).

Employers surely will continue to restrict class processes.  For many, the ADR process was a sideshow to the ability to limit class actions. New employment arbitration programs will be faced with the same legitimacy questions that adopters over the past 20 years have had to address, and now, with the higher-profile, perhaps more worker skepticism.

Plaintiffs’ lawyers will be forced to assess new approaches for dealing with clients’ work problems without the prospects of bigger matters.

The bottom line, of course, is that leading lawyers on both sides have been ready for today’s decision in the consolidated cases. Both already have begun maneuvering while now facing the decision they are still analyzing.

* * *

The cases involve arbitration provisions that kick in due to class waivers which prohibit employees from joining class processes—litigation or arbitration—in favor of mandatory, predispute, individualized arbitration to resolve disputes with their employers.

The decision is actually on three cases—NLRB v. Murphy Oil (No. 16-307), from the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals; Ernst & Young v. Morris (No. 16-300), from the Ninth Circuit, and the Seventh Circuit’s Epic Systems—that had been consolidated into the Court’s 2017-2018 term’s kickoff argument on Oct. 2, with four attorneys arguing the case on behalf of the parties in all three cases.

The long-contested issue began with the release in 2012 of an opinion by the National Labor Relations Board. The administrative decision, which found that class waivers illegally violated the National Labor Relations Act’s Sec. 7 allowing employees to take concerted action to confront their employer, was overturned repeatedly by the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in numerous cases.  See below.

The NLRB ruled that the class waivers eliminated by the FAA’s Sec. 2 savings clause, which enforces arbitration agreements “save upon such grounds as exist at law or in equity for the revocation of any contract.” The Fifth Circuit rejected that view on the ground it infringed on arbitration under the Federal Arbitration Act, a position strongly echoed today by the U.S. Supreme Court in the majority opinion written by Justice Neil Gorsuch.

The class waivers in question require workers, from collectively bargained rank-and file to executive suites, to address disputes with their employers in individual arbitration. While unions can agree to mandatory predispute arbitration on behalf of their members, the cases involved white-collar employees and nonunion workers with little bargaining power.

The Court had definitively permitted mandatory arbitration contract clauses accompanied by class waivers for products and services contracts where consumers have little or no bargaining power. See AT&T Mobility LLC v. Concepcion, 563 U. S. 333 (2011)(available at https://bit.ly/2KJc8RE).

The Federal Arbitration Act-focused decision today now settles how arbitration is used in workplace matters.

Cases challenging the class waivers that provided for mandatory arbitration flooded the federal courts, starting in the Fifth Circuit, which reversed the NLRB’s 2012 decision, In re D.R. Horton, 357 NLRB No. 184, 2012 WL 36274 (Jan. 3, 2012)(PDF download link at http://1.usa.gov/1IMkHn8), enforcement denied in relevant part, 737 F.3d 344 (5th Cir. 2013)(Graves, J., dissenting)(PDF download link at http://bit.ly/1XRvjrM), reh’g denied, No. 12-60031 (Apr. 16, 2014).

The Fifth Circuit became the venue of choice for employers seeking to reverse the NLRB’s finding that they had violated labor law by requiring class waivers and arbitration as a condition of employment. The New Orleans-based federal appeals court issued dozens of opinions countering in their reasoning, and then officially reversing in their holdings, the many NLRB decisions in which the board, an independent Washington agency, followed its D.R. Horton decision.  The reversal, however, only applied to law in the circuit in which the decision was made.

A circuit split emerged, from the Seventh and Ninth Circuits–first the Seventh Circuit’s Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis (No. 16-285), which became today’s lead Supreme Court case won by the employer, then with the case of Ernst & Young v. Morris (No. 16-300), from the Ninth Circuit.

The Court accepted the cases, along with NLRB v. Murphy Oil (No. 16-307), one of those Fifth Circuit decisions reversing the NLRB–which itself is a party in the case–and then consolidated the three cases with Epic Systems as the lead more than a year ago.  The argument in the cases kicked off the Court’s current term on Oct. 2.

For details on the arguments, see the blog by Alternatives’ publisher, the CPR Institute, CPR Speaks, at Mark Kantor, “Supreme Court Oral Argument on NLRB Class Actions vs. Arbitration Policy,” CPR Speaks (Oct. 2)(available at http://bit.ly/2fLwU9C), and Russ Bleemer, “The Class Waiver-Arbitration Argument: The Supreme Court Transcript,” CPR Speaks (Oct. 3) (available at http://bit.ly/2yWjWuf).

Kantor noted that the NLRB’s ruling that mandatory arbitration teamed with class waivers were illegal might have disappeared on its own with Trump administration appointees now installed as commissioners ready to reverse the Obama-era D. R. Horton administrative decision.

Regardless, Kantor noted, “This dispute is a reminder that many aspects of arbitration in the U.S. are now a partisan political issue, with regulatory measures addressing arbitration shifting back and forth as political party control shifts back and forth.”

In his majority opinion, Gorsuch used almost the same language.  See the end of CPR Speaks post on the dissent and the majority reaction here: https://bit.ly/2rXQFgT

* * *

For now, today’s Supreme Court has cleared up history’s questions by resolving the overarching issue, with the details to be worked out in employment policies, ADR sessions and, eventually, courtrooms nationwide.

Still, how that plays out in practice is far more in question than it was even a few months ago.

Arbitration has been under attack recently for its frequent use of confidentiality provisions by the #MeToo movement.  The ADR process has been a target in high-profile matters such as Gretchen Carlson’s settlement with her former employer, Fox News.

Microsoft CEO Brad Smith announced that the company would stop using mandatory employment arbitration with respect to sexual harassment claims (which was shortly followed by Uber and Lyft) and legislation barring the process has been proposed. Elena Gurevich, “Predispute Arbitration Would be Barred for Sex Harassment Claims under Legislative Proposal,” CPR Speaks blog (Jan. 25)(available at http://bit.ly/2FUyv4V).

And yet, the license to use arbitration has produced unintended consequences for employers.  A class of employees decertified by a California federal court bombarded national health club 24-Hour Fitness with hundreds of individual arbitrations earlier in the decade, forcing the company to settle all at once.  The decertification–over the claims’ content and unrelated to the class waiver issue—pushed the company to be more aggressive about defending its arbitration clauses, though the Supreme Court didn’t accept its case as part of the consolidated cases decided today. Jessica Goodheart, “Why 24 Hour Fitness Is Going to the Mat against Its Own Employees,” Fast Company (March 13)(available at http://bit.ly/2pkDPIm)

That hardline stance may be an anachronism, despite apparent backing from the Supreme Court today. Employers five years ago were exhibiting a much stronger preference for “mediation and other interest-based processes over mandatory arbitration and other rights-based processes.” David B. Lipsky, J. Ryan Lamare and Michael D. Maffie, “Mandatory Employment Arbitration:  Dispelling the Myths,” 32 Alternatives 133 (October 2014)(available at https://bit.ly/2s11Aqd).

That article also questioned whether employees were increasingly being subject to mandatory arbitration.  And new data from the same source, the Cornell University ILR School—see Colvin article linked above–indicates that the number has soared, more than tripling since the 1990s.  According to Colvin, more than half of employers now have mandatory arbitration, both with and without class waivers, with more than half the nation’s nonunion workers covered by the agreements.  That’s up from only two percent in 1992. Alexander J.S. Colvin, “The growing use of mandatory arbitration,” Economic Policy Institute (April 6, 2018)(available at https://bit.ly/2HxgQUL).

Whether more workplace conflict is diverted to resolution methods via human-resource departments’ open-door policies or mediation remains to be seen.  But the growing presence of mandatory arbitration at least guarantees more court cases that will drill down into finer points involving arbitration use—the limits and parameters will be under scrutiny more than the extent of the practice.

Next up for the Supreme Court’s arbitration scrutiny is Oliveira v. New Prime Inc., No. 17-340, which will investigate whether courts or arbitrators decide the arbitrability of a case where Federal Arbitration Act Sec. 1 exemption removing a case from arbitration applies. The case, which will be heard in the fall, could authorize further expansion of the reach of class waivers and mandatory arbitration to independent contractors from today’s employees’ decision. Early speculation is that Epic Systems makes Oliveira an easy call for the employers.

And three weeks ago, the Court took a second arbitration case for next year, Lamps Plus Inc. v. Varela, No. 17-988, which will examine the issue of whether the Federal Arbitration Act “forecloses a state-law interpretation of an arbitration agreement that would authorize class arbitration based solely on general language commonly used in arbitration agreements.”

Today’s Epic Systems decision will overshadow whatever happens in those cases for human resources executives and in employment lawyers’ offices for longer.  The battleground may move to legislatures.

* * *

Meantime, players on both sides have begun to assess it. They are elated—or searching for words, depending on their side of the employment fence.

Referring to the FAA, Cliff Palefsky, of San Francisco’s McGuinn Hillsman & Palefsky, who has represented employees in the 24- Hour Fitness litigation above, says that the Court “took a statute that Congress expressly said doesn’t apply to employment and used it to preempt the nation’s most significant labor and civil rights laws.”

Palefsky, who worked on an amicus brief filed in the consolidated cases on behalf of 10 labor unions and the National Employment Lawyers Association, and who is has been active on the employees’ side in the cases for years, says he’s still reviewing the decision, but adds, “It was an intellectually and legally indefensible political assault on worker’s rights.”

On the other side, Evan M. Tager, a Washington, D.C., Mayer Brown partner who has argued many arbitration cases on employers’ behalf, says, “The Court reaffirmed in the strongest possible terms that conditioning the enforcement of arbitration provisions on the availability of class-like procedures frustrates the purposes of arbitration and is not permissible absent a clear congressional command.”

Tager worked on Mayer Brown’s amicus brief on behalf of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in the consolidated cases.  He also represented the petitioner in AT&T Mobility, and says he was glad that the Court decision today reasserted that case’s view that FAA Sec. 2 doesn’t save the NLRB’s view that class waivers violated public policy, which he notes was “indistinguishable” from the rule invalidated 2011 case.

Christopher Murray, an Indianapolis shareholder in Ogletree Deakins–the firm that brought D.R. Horton to the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals where it was overturned, leading to today’s decision (the firm also submitted an amicus brief on behalf of trade associations in the consolidated cases)—says, “Today’s decision affirms what almost everyone already knew before the NLRB’s 2012 D.R  Horton decision: The NLRA has nothing to do with class-action procedures used by other decision makers to adjudicate claims under other statutes. Rather, the FAA gives parties the right to determine the procedures they’ll use in arbitration, including the right to arbitrate individually.”

Murray–who authored this month’s Alternatives cover story, “No Longer Silent: How Accurate Are Recent Criticisms of Employment Arbitration?” 38 Alternatives 65 (May 2018)(available at https://bit.ly/2rYmned), and who co-chairs his firm’s Arbitration and ADR Practice Group—adds, “This is a good decision for parties interested in any form of alternative dispute resolution because it confirms those parties are best situated to agree on the procedures to be used to resolve their disputes quickly, effectively, and fairly, and courts are generally not permitted under the FAA to second-guess those procedures.”

.

 

Russ Bleemer is the editor of CPR’s award-winning publication, Alternatives.

Future Challenges Nixed? Thomas Writes That Public Policy is Not FAA Illegality

By Russ Bleemer

There were two opinions in addition to the five-justice majority opinion this morning in Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis, No. 16-285, covering three consolidated cases that declared that employers may require their employees to use mandatory individual arbitration to resolve workplace disputes, and waive their rights to class processes in either traditional litigation class actions, or in class arbitration processes.

[Our first blog post on the majority opinion here: https://bit.ly/2KEuXFN  Opinion here: https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/17pdf/16-285_q8l1.pdf.%5D

Justice Clarence Thomas, who joined the majority, wrote separately to explain why he believes that the Federal Arbitration Act Sec. 2 savings clause relied upon by the employees didn’t apply.

Thomas’s concurrence explains that the Sec. 2 ground for revocation of an arbitration agreement—“valid, irrevocable, and enforceable, save upon such grounds as exist at law or in equity for the revocation of any contract” (9 U. S. C. §2)—concern the contract’s formation.

But the employees, Thomas writes, said the National Labor Relations Act makes the class waivers illegal, which is a public policy defense.

Because “‘[r]efusal to enforce a contract for public-policy reasons does not concern whether the contract was properly made,’ the saving clause does not apply here,” according to Thomas, quoting his concurrence in AT&T Mobility LLC v. Concepcion, 563 U. S. 333, 353, 357 (2011).

The position is a significant distinction and expands the majority opinion’s view that there was no Sec. 2 violation because the National Labor Relations Board interfered with a fundamental attribute of arbitration, also from AT&T Mobility.  Thomas’s position could be used by the Court to reject future challenges to arbitration contracts.

AT&T Mobility was the case in which the Court permitted mandatory individual arbitration with class waivers in consumer contracts.  Today’s Epic Systems decision mirrors AT&T Mobility in the workplace.

More on the Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg-authored dissent soon.

 

Russ Bleemer is editor of CPR’s award-winning publication, Alternatives.

U.S. Supreme Court Grants Cert to Decide “Who Decides” “Independent Contractor” Employment Arbitration Case

Kantor Photo (8-2012)By Mark Kantor

On February 26, the US Supreme Court granted certiorari to hear New Prime Inc. v. Oliveira, Case No. 17-340, a 1st US Circuit Court of Appeals decision in which the appeals court ruled on two questions: (1) Whether, under a contractual arrangement where the parties have delegated arbitrability questions to the arbitration, a court facing a motion to compel arbitration must first decide whether the US Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) covers or excludes the dispute or instead leave that question to be decided first by the arbitrators and (2) does the provision of Sec. 1 of the FAA excluding contracts of employment of transportation workers  from arbitration apply to an agreement that purports to establish an independent contractor relationship rather than an employer-employee relationship.

This case raises two questions of first impression in this circuit. First, when a federal district court is confronted with a motion to compel arbitration under the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA or Act), 9 U.S.C. §§ 1-16, in a case where the parties have delegated questions of arbitrability to the arbitrator, must the court first determine whether the FAA applies or must it grant the motion and let the arbitrator determine the applicability of the Act? We hold that the applicability of the FAA is a threshold question for the court to determine before compelling arbitration under the Act. Second, we must decide whether a provision of the FAA that exempts contracts of employment of transportation workers from the Act’s coverage, see id. § 1 (the § 1 exemption), applies to a transportation-worker agreement that establishes or purports to establish an independent-contractor relationship. We answer this question in the affirmative.

Oral argument in the matter will occur during the Fall term of the Supreme Court.

The underlying contractual agreements are easily summarized (footnotes omitted):

Among the documents Oliveira signed was an Independent Contractor Operating Agreement (the contract) between Prime and Hallmark.3 The contract specified that the relationship between the parties was that “of carrier and independent contractor and not an employer/employee relationship” and that “[Oliveira is] and shall be deemed for all purposes to be an independent contractor, not an employee of Prime.”4 Additionally, under the contract, Oliveira retained the rights to provide transportation services to companies besides Prime,5 refuse to haul any load offered by Prime, and determine his own driving times and delivery routes. The contract also obligated Oliveira to pay all operating and maintenance expenses, including taxes, incurred in connection with his use of the truck leased from Success. Finally, the contract contained an arbitration clause under which the parties agreed to arbitrate “any disputes arising under, arising out of or relating to [the contract], . . . including the arbitrability of disputes between the parties.”6

Ultimately, Oliveira filed a class action in US District Court against Prime notwithstanding the arbitration clause.  Oliveira alleged that Prime violated the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), 29 U.S.C. §§ 201-219, as well as the Missouri minimum-wage statute, by failing to pay its truck drivers minimum wage. Oliveira also asserted a class claim for breach of contract or unjust enrichment and an individual claim for violation of Maine labor statutes.  Prime moved to compel arbitration under the FAA.

The provision of the FAA at issue in this dispute is Section 1, which excludes from the coverage of the FAA “contracts of employment of seamen, railroad employees, or any other class of workers engaged in foreign or interstate commerce.”

Section 1 of the FAA provides that the Act shall not apply “to contracts of employment of seamen, railroad employees, or any other class of workers engaged in foreign or interstate commerce.” Id. § 1. The Supreme Court has interpreted this section to “exempt[] from the FAA . . . contracts of employment of transportation workers.”

On the “who decides” issue, the Court of Appeals held in New Prime Inc. v. Oliveira that the courts, rather than the arbitrators, are the proper place to decide whether these disputes are covered by, or exempted from, the FAA.  Having decided the “who decides” question to place the resolution in the courts, the appellate judges then concluded that, on the particular facts of the case, “a transportation-worker agreement that establishes or purports to establish an independent-contractor relationship is a contract of employment under § 1,” and thus excluded from the FAA.

Given the dramatic increase in “independent contractor” agreements in the workplace over the last decades, this case may determine whether a large variety of labor disputes are heard in court or may instead be subjected to mandatory arbitration agreements.  The Scotusblog.com case page with the appellate decision and cert filings is here – http://www.scotusblog.com/case-files/cases/new-prime-inc-v-oliveira/.

 

Mark Kantor is a CPR Distinguished Neutral. Until he retired from Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy, Mark was a partner in the Corporate and Project Finance Groups of the Firm. He currently serves as an arbitrator and mediator. He teaches as an Adjunct Professor at the Georgetown University Law Center (Recipient, Fahy Award for Outstanding Adjunct Professor). Additionally, Mr. Kantor is Editor-in-Chief of the online journal Transnational Dispute Management.

This material was first published on OGEMID, the Oil Gas Energy Mining Infrastructure and Investment Disputes discussion group sponsored by the on-line journal Transnational Dispute Management (TDM, at https://www.transnational-dispute-management.com/), and is republished with consent.

Ninth Circuit Backs NLRB’s View Barring Mandatory Pre-dispute Class Waivers, Deepening a Circuit Split

By Ksenia Koriukalova

The Ninth U.S. Court of Appeals Monday joined the Seventh Circuit in supporting the position of the National Labor Relations Board against “concerted action waivers” in employment agreements

Morris v. Ernst & Young LLP, No. 13-16599 (9th Cir. August 22, 2016) (available at http://bit.ly/2bqiU0k) contributes to deepening the circuit split regarding the enforceability of class waivers that compel employees to take their employment disputes to individual arbitration.

Morris v. Ernst & Young was the first case in which the NLRB intervened as amicus curiae to urge the court to support its view on the issue, which has been rejected by the Fifth and Eighth Circuits, but backed by the Seventh Circuit in Lewis v. Epic Systems Corp., No. 15-2997 (7th Cir. May 26, 2016) (available at http://bit.ly/1U8lhTW).

Lewis, the first in which the NLRB argued, caused the split.  The Lewis parties requested and received an extension to decide upon and prepare a petition for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court.  Arbitration experts and analysts expect that employer Epic Systems will file for an appeal sometime next month.

On Monday, in the 2-1 Morris opinion written by Chief Circuit Judge Sidney R. Thomas, the Ninth Circuit vacated a federal district court order compelling individual arbitration in a class and collective action brought by Ernst & Young employees.

The action was originally brought in New York for the alleged misclassification of employees and violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act. After the case was transferred to California’s Northern District, Ernst & Young filed a motion to compel arbitration in accordance with the agreements executed by the plaintiffs as a condition of their employment.

The agreements contained provisions requiring the employees to pursue their legal claims against the accounting and consulting giant exclusively through arbitration, and to arbitrate only in their individual capacity and in “separate proceedings.”

The plaintiffs argued that the “separate proceedings” clause of their agreements violated federal law, in particular the National Labor Relations Act, or NLRA. The district court granted the employer’s motion to compel individual arbitration. The appellate court disagreed with that decision.

For full details on the November 2015 Morris argument in the Ninth Circuit, as well as information on the background of the case and resources on the class waivers-NLRA issue, see “Cutting Arbitration Classes: Facing Court Defeats on Workplace Waivers, the NLRB Refuses To Back Down,” 34 Alternatives 1 (January 2016)(available at http://bit.ly/2c3hewf).

This week, the Ninth Circuit overturned the district court decision and joined the Seventh Circuit view that class waivers mandating arbitration violate federal labor law.

Specifically, the Ninth Circuit panel held that by requiring employees to sign agreements containing “concerted action waivers,” the employer interfered with the employees’ “essential, substantive right” to “engage in concerted activity” granted by the NLRA § 7.

The panel relied on the NLRB’s decision D.R. Horton, Inc., 357 NLRB No. 184, 2012 WL 36274 (Jan. 3, 2012)(PDF download link at http://1.usa.gov/1IMkHn8), enforcement denied in relevant part, 737 F.3d 344 (5th Cir. 2013) (Graves, J., dissenting)(PDF download link at http://bit.ly/1XRvjrM), reh’g denied, No. 12-60031 (Apr. 16, 2014).

In its original D.R. Horton decision, the NLRB concluded that an employer’s requirement that an employee sign a waiver as a condition of employment violated the NLRA. The Ninth Circuit analyzed NLRA § 7, which establishes an employees’ rights to engage in concerted activities, and NLRA § 8, which enforces collective action rights.  The circuit appeals court agreed with the NLRB’s D.R. Horton interpretation of these statutory provisions.

“This case turns on a well-established principle,” wrote Chief Circuit Judge Thomas, “employees have the right to pursue work-related legal claims together.  . . . Concerted activity—the right of employees to act together—is the essential, substantive right established by the NLRA. 29 U.S.C. § 157. Ernst & Young interfered with that right by requiring its employees to resolve all of their legal claims in ‘separate proceedings.’” [Citations omitted.]

Moreover, the Ninth Circuit also held that the application of the Federal Arbitration Act did not change its conclusion. The panel found that the requirement to pursue legal claims against an employer in “separate proceedings” violated the NLRA, irrespective of whether employees were required to bring their complaints in arbitration or in court.

Circuit Judge Sandra Ikuta dissented, concluding that that the arbitration agreements signed by Ernst & Young employees were enforceable, because the NLRA did not contain a “contrary congressional command” overriding the FAA.

Morris v. Ernst & Young deepens the circuit split on enforceability of class action waivers in employment agreements. In addition to D.R. Horton, the Fifth Circuit also has reversed the NLRB’s decision repeatedly, most notably in Murphy Oil USA Inc., Case 10–CA–038804, 361 NLRB No. 72, 2014 WL 5465454 (Oct. 28, 2014) (PDF download link at http://bit.ly/1LVnR8d), enforcement denied in relevant part, 2015 WL 6457613 (5th Cir. Oct. 26, 2015)(PDF download link at http://bit.ly/1TMfDFO).

The Eighth Circuit followed the Fifth Circuit’s view in Cellular Sales of Missouri LLC v. NLRB, 824 F.3d 772 (8th Cir. 2016).  Earlier the Second Circuit also found class action waiver provisions in employment-related arbitration agreements to be enforceable. (see Sutherland v. Ernst & Young LLP, 726 F.3d 290 (2d Cir. 2013)) But the viability of Sutherland decision is in question following the oral argument in Patterson v. Raymours Furniture Co. heard by the Second Circuit this past Friday.

The Seventh Circuit supported the NRLB’s interpretation in Lewis v. Epic Systems Corp., where the appeals court reaffirmed the NLRB’s position that class action waivers contained in arbitration agreements employees were required to sign as a condition of their employment violated the NLRA.

Monday’s Ninth Circuit Morris decision is powerful support for Lewis. As a result, while the concerted action waivers in employment-related agreements are considered incompatible with the federal labor law in the Seventh and the Ninth Circuit, the Fifth, the Eighth and the Second Circuits render them enforceable–that is, until the Supreme Court of the United States addresses the issue of the compatibility of the NLRA and the FAA nationwide.

The author is a Fall 2016 CPR Legal Intern. And please stay tuned: there will be more on the Patterson case posted here before the weekend! 

THE NEUTRAL’S NOTEPAD: Which ADR Technique – Choose Carefully

 

Steven Platt

CPR is happy to present the latest installment of “The Neutral’s Notepad,” in which members of our esteemed panel of neutrals contribute their thoughts on developments and best practices in dispute resolution. 

By Judge Steven I. Platt

Which dispute resolution technique should parties and their counsel use in the courthouse or conference room of the future? That was the question with which I concluded my last column. The short answer is the classic lawyer’s response – it depends!

The decision to utilize ADR and even the choice of which ADR technique to employ is often made by a business client who thinking he or she is saving money unknowingly at his or her peril includes a “form” dispute resolution clause in its commercial documents in an attempt to anticipate problems which might arise in the transaction and/or business or professional relationship. That “form” dispute resolution clause is often pulled from a book which should be titled “Dispute Resolution Clauses For Dummies” and prepared without the assistance of counsel. This usually means it is included in the contract without a full understanding of its ramifications. A poorly conceived and drafted dispute resolution clause in a contract can wreak havoc on the operations and finances of even the better run business organizations. This is true even when counsel is involved.

I have observed countless cases as a judge and now as a private mediator and arbitrator where the dispute resolution clause was drafted by a primarily transactional lawyer obviously without consulting the litigator perhaps in the same office who ultimately would have to work within the confines of the language in the clause if a dispute arose. This inevitably puts the client in an unnecessarily exposed position.

Business cases, labor disputes, buy-sell agreements, franchise agreements, and particularly employment disputes to name only a few types of cases arise in many contexts that have not been anticipated and for that reason are not governed by the dispute resolution clause inserted in a contract without much thought. These claims and the defenses to them each carry a unique potential for their own narrative which can develop into drama in the hands of capable litigators, parties, and witnesses in a forum that favors such a presentation. Therefore, it would behoove the prudent business or individual client and his or her careful and thoughtful transactional lawyer after consultation with the experienced litigator down the hall to think about the choice of dispute resolution mechanisms and providers before typing and pressing the print key on the desktop to insert the final version in their contract. That means it is wise to keep in mind how the client and any witnesses are likely to present before different types of audiences. Will they naturally make a good impression on a judge or jury. If not, then an arbitration perhaps preceded by a mediation probably is a better choice because it would be easier to guide clients and witnesses in these more intimate and less formal ADR settings than in a courtroom.

The consequences of not being careful or not being able to visualize how a particular dispute resolution protocol and provider would play out in the future have recently become much more apparent as what has been labeled the “Deflategate” case has played out on the national stage. As a result of allegations that New England Patriot Quarterback Tom Brady ordered/aided/abetted the deflating of one or more footballs in the Patriots playoff game with the Seattle Seahawks, the arbitration provision negotiated by the NFL Players Association with the NFL became operational. This resulted in a proceeding before Arbitration Commissioner Roger Goodell who arguably was arbitrary and capricious in the conduct of the arbitration hearing and the imposition of a 4-game suspension on Brady. That was the view of U.S. District Court Judge Richard M. Berman who nullified the suspension on the grounds that the conduct of the arbitration albeit arguably allowed under the arbitration provision of the collective bargaining agreement was unfair and therefore nullified it.

That ruling was reversed by a Three Judge Panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit who held that “The Commissioner properly exercised his broad discretion under the collective bargaining agreement and that his procedural rulings were properly grounded in that agreement and did not deprive Brady of fundamental fairness”.

This latest ruling by a divided Panel of the 2nd Circuit (2-1) basically sent the message subject to a successful appeal to the full 2nd Circuit and/or the U.S. Supreme Court that if you aren’t careful and agree to a private arbitral procedure and/or provider which results in an unfair proceeding and result you’re bound by what you agreed to. So Buyer Beware – you make an uncomfortable arbitral bed with a headboard/Arbitrator who is unfair – you lie in it!

This post is reprinted with permission from “A Pursuit of Justice,” a blog by Judge Steven I. Platt (Ret.) that focuses on the intersection of law, economics, politics and the development of public policy.  Judge Platt currently owns and operates his own private Alternative Dispute Resolution Company, The Platt Group, Inc. through which several retired judges and experienced practitioners offer mediation, arbitration and neutral case evaluation services to business, governmental agencies and their lawyers mostly in complex litigation and disputes.  Judge Platt’s experience and vocation make him an expert in conflict resolution particularly in complex disputes whether they are political, economic, legal, or as most often the case all of the above. Judge Platt can be reached at info@apursuitofjustice.com.

[EDITOR’S NOTE: Please also see the two ADR Briefs “Deflategate” stories in the June issue of Alternatives HERE.]

AFTER THE VETO: The Current State of Employment Arbitration in Brazil

By Cristiane Ordonez and Colin McGeough, CPR Legal Interns

According to an article published by José Pastore, a professor at FEA-University of São Paulo, Brazil’s National Congress voted to approve the use of arbitration for the arbitration of employment disputes, but Brazilian President, Dilma Rousseff, reacted to the legislation by banning employment arbitration via her veto power. Pastore and others in Brazil advocate strongly in favor of ADR of employment disputes.

After the initial approval by the National Congress, employment arbitration was limited to directors and managers who agreed to use arbitration as their preferred dispute resolution method; however, according to Pastore, Brazil’s President banned even the limited use of employment arbitration because of the position of the Ministry of Labor. In short, the Ministry of Labor argued that the use of arbitration for some would lead to discrimination against others. Pastore also mentions, in his article, that the Ministry of Labor took issue with the reference to “managers” and “directors” because the Ministry felt those terms were strangers to Brazil’s legislation. In opposition to that, Pastore points out that the Labor Code, Civil Code, and others have those words present within their paragraphs, and any issue with “managers” and “directors” should not have been taken so seriously.

One of the largest frustrations from the veto seems to come from the idea that employment arbitration could have had such a positive effect on employment courts, the parties, and the judiciary system in Brazil. It could have, and likely would have, offered a quicker and more simplified method of dispute resolution than litigation because non-arbitral court disputes often have additional costs and longer proceedings that can span many months or even years.

Another disappointment comes with the veto as well, one that involves Brazil not having the benefit of being on par with so many other developed countries that have laws that use and allow employment arbitration. Pastore discusses the laws of the United States, various countries of the EU and Asia, and Australia and New Zealand. Furthermore, Pastore shows that 97% of collective agreements to settle employment disputes in the US opt for arbitration. Pastore’s theory, as we understand it, is that the use of employment arbitration by developed countries will cause these types of arbitrations to spread to Latin American countries too. Many Brazilians, including Pastore, hoped it would have happened by now, but the President’s veto has delayed such progress.

It must be said that Pastore also stresses the importance of parties having the autonomy to choose arbitration rather than being forced to litigate all employment disputes, or in fact having mandatory arbitrations. Allowing parties to choose between litigation and arbitration affords many more benefits than it does detriments because every dispute is different and party choice allows for different methods of conflict resolution that will best fit the needs of a party’s case. However, Pastore urges the use of arbitration as an option because non-arbitral proceedings are often transactions of “sealed packages.”  In other words, claimants ask for one thing, respondents offer another, and a judge ends up settling the dispute by ordering something completely different.

It is hard to believe, in the eyes of Pastore, that Brazil’s President and Labor Courts would ban an alternative dispute method (arbitration) for employment disputes because the courts are crowded, and both the courts and parties are suffering from high litigation costs. As mentioned earlier, Pastore believes the veto needs to be reviewed and the issue solved as quickly as possible.

Cristiane is a Brazilian attorney serving as a fellow of CPR, a Florida accredited mediator and a mediator and conciliator working in Brazil.  Colin is a summer legal intern at CPR, a rising 3L at New York Law School, and President of New York Law School’s Dispute Resolution Team.